The Legislature

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  • Created by: T Colby
  • Created on: 31-05-16 22:02
What is the traditional legislative role of the House of Lords?
To amend and revise bills.
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How much of its time does the House of Lords spend fulfilling its traditional role of amending and revising bills?
2/3
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What are sent to the House of Commons after going through the House of Lords?
Bills that have been amended and revised by the House of Lords.
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What is the Salisbury Doctrine (Convention)?
Ensures major government bills can get through the House of Lords without a majority in the house. Or that the house doesn't try to vote down a bill in its second or third reading.
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What is the Parliament Act 1911?
Meant the House of Lords could no longer veto bills. It can only delay a bill for up to 2 years.
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What two things does the House of Lords scrutinise through?
Select Committees and Question Time (PMQs).
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What is the deliberative role of the House of Lords?
Peers can choose party allegiance and party lines are not held.
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What is the legitimising role of the House of Lords?
It is an elected body. It is the chief legitimising role. It gives formal approval for bills to pass through.
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What is the judicicial role of the House of Lords?
The government replaced the judicial role in 2009 with the creation of the Supreme Court.
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How many members is the House of Lords composed of?
Nearly 800 members.
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How many peers leave of absence in the House of Lords?
49.
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What is the only legislative chamber in the world that is larger than the House of Lords?
China's National People's Congress.
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How many seats are currently in the House of Lords?
821.
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How many peers are currently in the House of Lords?
39.
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How many peers were hereditary in 2015 in the House of Lords?
87.
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What two types of members are in the House of Lords?
Appointed and hereditary.
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How many senior Church of England Bishops (Lords spiritual) are currently in the House of Lords?
26.
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What does the Speaker chair in the House of Commons?
House Committee.
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What does the speaker sit on?
Procedure Committee.
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What does the Speaker not have?
Executive responsibilities.
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Why is the Fox Hunting Bill a reason for reform of the House of Lords?
The bill ran out of time and it used tactics to enable the bill to not be passed for a long time.
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Who introduced the Fox Hunting Bill?
Michael Foster MP.
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Why is the delay to tax credit cuts a reason for House of Lords reform?
It should act more appropriately with its powers.
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Give some reasons for the House of Lords being reformed.
A completely elected chamber would allow greater legitimacy allowing for the House of Lords to scrutinise legislation more effectively. It has only been partly reformed and it should be finished to be more representative and democratic.
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Give some reasons for the House of Lords not being reformed.
A completely elected chamber would prevent the government from acting quickly. If it was elected then peers would need time to be representative of constituents. Hereditary peers and life peers have lots of experience.
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When was the Salisbury Doctrine (Convention) enforced?
1911.
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What was enforced in 1911 besides the Salisbury Doctrine (Convention)?
The Parliament Act 1911.
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When was the second Parliament Act?
The Parliament Act 1949.
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When was the Life Peerages Act?
The Life Peerages Act 1958.
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When was the Peerage Act?
The Peerage Act 1963.
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When was the creation of the House of Lords speaker?
2006.
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Give an example of effective scrutiny.
• An MP would usually attend a calling to appear at a Select Committee and answer the questions asked. Not doing so could attract negative media attention.
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Give a second example of effective scrutiny.
• The government has to consider informal scrutiny by members of the government’s own party. Since 1997, Labour has made concessions on foundations hospitals and top up fees to head of potential backbench rebellions.
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Give a third example of effective scrutiny.
• Select Committees ensure that questions are asked of the government. If they know this, they will be more likely to conduct themselves in a representative and accountable way.
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Give an example of ineffective scrutiny.
• MPs can be expelled from the party by the Chief Whip if they vote against the party in a three line whipped vote.
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Give a second example of ineffective scrutiny.
• Most Common’s debates are sparsely attended and have little impact on government policy. During ministerial questions, ministers do not have to answer questions.
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Give a third example of ineffective scrutiny.
• Tony Wright, a government MP has said that on Standing Committees government MPs are “told to say nothing so that the bill goes through as quickly as possible. This is the reality of how legislation is scrutinised”.
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What are the five methods of scrutiny employed by the legislature in scrutinising the executive?
Select Committees, Standing Committees, Debates, Question Time (PMQs) and Informal Scrutiny.
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How many departmental select committees are there?
18.
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How often do select committees meet?
Once a week.
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How much of its time does the House of Lords spend fulfilling its traditional role of amending and revising bills?

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What are sent to the House of Commons after going through the House of Lords?

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Card 4

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What is the Salisbury Doctrine (Convention)?

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Card 5

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What is the Parliament Act 1911?

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