The British Constitution

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Sovereignty
The power usually ascribed to a country, to make decisions of government without the influence of exteranl forces.
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Constitution
A legal framework detailing the composition and responsibilities of the institiurion of government and describing their relations both with each other and with the country's citizens.
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Liberal Democracy
The actions of the government reflect the will of the people at least the majority of them.
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Executive
Responsible for formulating policies and laws.
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Legislature
Where laws is discussed and made.
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Monarchical
A country whose roles and powers are limited by: 1) the rules under the constitiution 2) Presence of more powerful state institutions.
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Republican
A form of government/ constitution belonging to or characteristics of republic.
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Parliamentary
Where the government or chief executive is drawn from a sovereign legislature and relies upon it's supoort in order to remain in office.
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Presidential
A system of government under which a president acts as chief executive or head of government.
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Entenched
Where laws or constitutional provisions are afforded greater protection from arbitrary change than regular statutes.
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EU Law
Since 1973 when the UK joined EEC-EU treaties, legislation and judgments of European Court of Justice have become a part of the constitution
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Common Law
Most of the traditional civil liberties e.g freedom of speech were originally established in common law
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Statute Law
Laws passed by parliament
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Conventions
The tradition that the Queen chooses the leader of the majority party to be PM
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Works Of Authority
Certain texts are accepted as works of authority on the constitution
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Elective Dictatorship
a ​government that is ​elected but has ​won so many ​votes that it can do what it ​likes
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Separation Of Powers
the vesting of the legislative, executive, and judiciary powers of government in separate bodies.
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Judicial Independence
That judges are not subject to pressure and influence, and are free to make impartial decisions based solely on fact and law.
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Judicial Neutrality
A judge should treat wveryone equally and should not be bias towards or against particular groups in society.
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Social Neutrality
Judges are unable to be neutral due to the background/section of society from which they are from. They can be accuse of being biased against women, ethnic minorities, unemployed, homeless etc.
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Political Neutrality
Judges are biased against the Labour party. (Griffiths 1970 -) Their social background suggests that if they come from a private background, they are more likely to be conservative that Labour or Liberals.
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Card 2

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A legal framework detailing the composition and responsibilities of the institiurion of government and describing their relations both with each other and with the country's citizens.

Back

Constitution

Card 3

Front

The actions of the government reflect the will of the people at least the majority of them.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Responsible for formulating policies and laws.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Where laws is discussed and made.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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