Other questions in this quiz

2. How does social identity theory explain prejudice and discrimination?

  • If a member of the outgroup enters the context of the ingroup, to retain the distinctiveness of the groups identity prejudice will occur
  • If the distinctiveness of the group identity is perceived to be threatened, increased effort will be made to make the ingroup dissimilar to outgroup (prejudice)
  • The ingroup will conform in displaying prejudice and discrimination towards the outgroup
  • If the outgroup has different beliefs to the ingroup, there will be prejudice

3. What is implicit prejudice?

  • Lower levels of prejudice such as microaggressions and negative body language
  • Higher levels of prejudice such as legitimised prejudice and dehumanisation
  • Prejudice that lies beneath concious awareness, may influence behaviours that are difficult to control (e.g eye movement)
  • Prejudice that lies in concious awareness, may influence behaviours that are difficult to control (e.g eye movement)

4. What is extended contact?

  • Mentally simulating a meeting with outgroup members
  • When ingroup members have outgroup friends
  • When positive behaviours are acquired through observing ingroup/outgroup relationships

5. What did a fMRI study by Harris & Fiske (2009) show about effects of dehumanisation?

  • Observed reduced brain activity in regions associated with empathy in TOM of perpetrators.
  • Observed reduced brain activity in regions associated with empathy in TOM of victims.
  • Observed increased brain activity in regions associated with empathy in TOM of perpetrators.
  • Observed increased brain activity in regions associated with empathy in TOM of victims.

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