TB4 Lecture 4; Decision making and the brain

The main objectives in this lecture are;

  • Expected value v.s expected utility
  • Reward and the brain
  • Temporal discounting
  • Social decision making
  • Heuristics in decision making
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  • Created by: mint75
  • Created on: 25-05-15 17:59

1. Dopamine neurons in which 4 areas are linked to rewards?

  • Ventromedial pFC, Nucleus accumbens, Dorsal-tegmental area, substantianigra
  • Ventromedial pFC, Nucleus accumbens, Ventral-tegmental area, substantianigra
  • pFC, Nucleus accumbens, Ventral-tegmental area, substantianigra
  • pFC, Nucleus accumbens, Dorsal-tegmental area, substantianigra
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Other questions in this quiz

2. What did a study by Matsumoto & Hikosake (2009) find?

  • A subset of DP neurons in the midbrain responded to negative but not positive events.
  • A subset of DP neurons in the midbrain responded to both positive and negative events.
  • A subset of DP neurons in the midbrain responded to positive but not negative events.
  • DP neurons will always fire with a pleasing stimulus

3. What is the status quo bias?

  • Preference for current state of affairs
  • Presentation of another option that is inferior in all respects has shown to influence preference

4. What is a heuristic?

  • Receiving a positive reward after avoiding a stimulus
  • A mental shortcut that allows people to make mental judgements quickly and efficiently
  • A trust game played between two pps
  • 'Fast and frugal' judgments that are only made by humans

5. What is the framing effect?

  • People tend to avoid risk when a positive frame is presented, but sees risk more when a negative frame is presented (even when options are the same! For example saving people, or killing people in vaccine example).
  • When the expected utility exceeds the objective value
  • People tend to avoid risk when a negative frame is presented, but sees risk more when a positive frame is presented (even when options are the same! For example saving people, or killing people in vaccine example).
  • When the objective value exceeds that of the expected utility

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