Symbolism

How the characters and objects featured in the book are represented and what they symbolise.

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The Conch
A democracy and order. As the boys deteriorate so does the conch. Ralph clutches it desperately when he talks about his role in Simon's murder (page 173).
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Piggy's Glasses
Piggy constantly clears them, so he can see with more clarity. They represent the power of science and intellectual endeavor in society. The boys use them to focus the sunlight and start a fire, when they are stolen, Ralph's group is helpless.
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The Signal Fire
When the fire is first lit, it represents how the boys want to escape the island, but when the fire dies out, so does the desire to leave. The boys accept their life of savagery.
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The Lord of the Flies
The sow's head which speaks to Simon during his hallucination foreshadowing his death (page 158). It is also seen to represent the devil, which other name is The Lord of the Flies.
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The Beast
The imaginary beast stands for the primal instinct of savagery that exists within all people. Simon is the only boy to realise that the beast exists only as the fear within the boys. The more savage the boys, the stronger the belief of the beast.
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Ralph
Ralph represents order, leadership, and civilization.
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Piggy
Piggy represents the scientific and intellectual aspects of civilization.
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Jack
Jack represents unbridled savagery and the desire for power.
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Simon
Simon represents natural human goodness.
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Roger
Roger represents brutality and bloodlust at their most extreme.
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The Littluns
They reflect common people, or the working class. Ralph and Simon protect the Littleuns and advance the good of the group. Jack and Roger use the boys for their own amusement and use their power to gratify their own desires.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Piggy constantly clears them, so he can see with more clarity. They represent the power of science and intellectual endeavor in society. The boys use them to focus the sunlight and start a fire, when they are stolen, Ralph's group is helpless.

Back

Piggy's Glasses

Card 3

Front

When the fire is first lit, it represents how the boys want to escape the island, but when the fire dies out, so does the desire to leave. The boys accept their life of savagery.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The sow's head which speaks to Simon during his hallucination foreshadowing his death (page 158). It is also seen to represent the devil, which other name is The Lord of the Flies.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The imaginary beast stands for the primal instinct of savagery that exists within all people. Simon is the only boy to realise that the beast exists only as the fear within the boys. The more savage the boys, the stronger the belief of the beast.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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