SY3

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FUNCTIONALISM- Durkheim
Crime and deviance occured as a result of ANOMIE. A certain amound of crime could be seen as positive for society.
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FUCTIONALISM- Merton
American/British society socialises individuals to meet certain shared goals. THE AMERICAN DREAM
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SUB-CULTURAL- Cohen
Working class youths face BLOCKED OPPORTUNITIES because of their position in the social class structure.
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SUB-CULTURAL- Cloward and Ohlin
The form working class delinquent subcultures take depends on access to ILLEGITIMATE OPPORTUNITIES.
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SUB-CULTURAL- Miller
Lower class youths are socialised into a set of lower class values or FOCAL CONCERNS
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INTERACTIONALISM- Becker
What we count as crime and deviance is based on subjective decisions made by MORAL ENTREPENEURS. Once a the deviant LABEL is accepted, deviants may join or conform to deviant subcultures.
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INTERACTIONALISM- Lemert
Primary deviance which has not been LABELLED has few consequences for the individual concerned. Once deviance is labelled it becomes secondary and impacts on an individual.
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MARXISM- Gordon
Criminogenic Capitalism - Crime is a RATIONAL RESPONSE to the capitalist system and is found in all sual classes
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MARXISM- Chambliss
The state and law making - laws to protect PRIVATE PROPERY are the cornerstone of the capitalist economy
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MARXISM- Snider
The state and law making- The capitalist state is reluctant to pass laws that REGULATE the activities of businesses or threaten their profitability.
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MARXISM- Reiman
Selective enforcement- STREET CRIMES such as assault and theft are far more likely to be reported by police than WHITE COLLAR CRIME such as fraud.
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MARXISM- Pearce
Selective enforcement- Argues that such laws often benefit the RULING CLASS too. By giving capitalism a CARING FACE, such laws create flase consiousness among the workers.
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NEO-MARXISM- Taylor et al
Rejection of the marxist - They believe that crime is a voluntary act.
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RIGHT REALISM- Murray
Blamed the WELFARE STATE for creating dependancy and for weakening the work ethic. Boys growing up without suitable male role models and passing on anti-social behaviour is responsible for crime. FATHERLESS FAMILIES
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RIGHT REALISM- Felson
ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY- Argues that for a crime to occur, there must be a MOTIVATED OFFENDER.
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LEFT REALISM- Lea and Young
RELATIVE DEPRIVATION- The gap between the expectations people have and the reality of what they can obtain explains crime.
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FEMINISM- Heindensohn
Suggests several reasons why other approaches ignore women. Sociology was DOMINATED by MEN, who found female crime unimportant. Couldn't find examples for female crime (FEMALE GANGS)
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FEMINISM- Box
Suggests that for serious offences the 5:1 ratio suggested by OFFICIAL STATISTICS is accurate.
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FEMINISM- Smart
Women are treated MORE HARSHLY, especially when the offence involces breaking EXPECTATIONS of female behaviour.
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FEMINISM- Carlen
Women rejected roles because of negative EXPERIENCES of family life as children - this caused them to turn to crime.
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ETHNICITY- Phillips and Bowling
Public attention has turned to the over representation of AFRICAN CARIBBEAN people in prison. ASIAN GANGS developed.
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ETHNICITY- Gilroy
Black criminality is a MYTH. ASIANS originate from former colonies of Britain. Myth of black crime is result of police NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES.
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ETHNICITY- Lea and Young
Crime rate for WHITE is lower than ASIANS.
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ETHNICITY- Hall et al
There was a MORAL PANIC about crime and mugging.
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Card 2

Front

FUCTIONALISM- Merton

Back

American/British society socialises individuals to meet certain shared goals. THE AMERICAN DREAM

Card 3

Front

SUB-CULTURAL- Cohen

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

SUB-CULTURAL- Cloward and Ohlin

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

SUB-CULTURAL- Miller

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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