Studland Bay and Holderness Case Studies

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Where is Studland Bay?
a) Dorset
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What are some of the environmental characteristics in Studland Bay?
It is mostly sheltered from highly erosive waves, but the southern end of the bay is being eroded. There are sandy beaches with sand dunes and heathland behind them.
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The heathland in Studland Bay is a nature reserve and an SSSI. What is an SSSI?
Site of Special Scientific Interest
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Give some examples of wildlife in Studland Bay.
Reptiles - adders, grass snakes, slow worms. Birds - rare Dartford Warbler, shelducks, grebes. Fish - Studland Bay is the only place in UK where the spiny seahorse breeds. Plants - marram grass, lyme grass, heather.
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How is Marram Grass adapted to live in Studland Bay?
Folded leaves to reduce water loss (sand dunes are windy and dry which increases transpiration), long roots to take up water and stabilise itself in the sand.
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How is Lyme Grass adapted to live in Studland Bay?
Waxy leaves to reduce water loss by transpiration.
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How are Grebes adapted to live in Studland Bay?
Dive underwater to find food in the sea, feet are far back on their bodies to help them dive (it makes them streamlined).
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How are snakes and lizards adapted to live in Studland Bay?
Thick, scaly skin to reduce water loss from their bodies and protect them from rough undergrowth on the heathland.
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How is erosion of sand dunes managed in Studland Bay? (3)
National Trust: >boardwalks >Marram grass stabilises dunes >Information boards educating people about importance of protecting sand dune habitat
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Seahorses live in the seagrass in Studland Bay. This can be destroyed by boat anchors. How is this being managed?
Seahorses are protected by law, so boat owners are being told not to damage the seagrass.
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In 2008 a fire destroyed six acres of heathland. How is this being managed? (3)
>The National Trust is educating visitors on the dangers of causing fires >They have provided fire beaters >Barbecuing is only allowed in designated areas.
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Where is Holderness? What distance does it stretch?
East Yorkshire. 61 km long.
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How much land is lost to the sea each year in Holderness?
About 1.8m of land, in recent years around 10m per year in Great Cowden.
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What are the main reasons for rapid erosion in Holderness? (4)
>Boulder clay slumps when wet >Naturally narrow beaches provide less protection >People have somewhat worsened the situation with groynes >Powerful waves due to prevailing wind from Arctic Ocean
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What are some of the impacts on people's lives in Holderness? (6)
>Homes near cliffs at risk of collapse >Property prices have fallen sharply >Accessibility to some settlements has been affected because of roads collapsing >Businesses at risk - people lose their jobs >Gas terminal at Easington at risk>farmland lost
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What is an impact on the environment in Holderness?
Some SSSIs are threatened, e.g. the Lagoons near Easington. The lagoons are separated from the sea by a narrow bar. If this is eroded it will destroy the lagoons.
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What strategies have been used in Bridlington?
4.7km sea wall and wooden groynes.
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What strategies have been used in Hornsea?
Sea wall, wooden groynes, rock armour.
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What strategies have been used in Mappleton?
2 rock groynes which cost £2 million and were built to protect the village and roads from erosion and flooding.
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How are these strategies causing problems elsewhere in Holderness? (5)
>Groynes narrow beaches further down the coast, e.g. Cowden Farm >Humber Estuary to the South at risk of flooding because there is less material >Rate of coastal retreat in Lincolnshire increased >Spurn Head at risk of being eroded away >Bays forming
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What is the problem of bays being formed in Holderness?
Bays are forming between protected areas, meaning headlands are also formed - headlands are eroded more heavily. This means that maintaining the sea defences in the protected areas is becoming more expensive.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are some of the environmental characteristics in Studland Bay?

Back

It is mostly sheltered from highly erosive waves, but the southern end of the bay is being eroded. There are sandy beaches with sand dunes and heathland behind them.

Card 3

Front

The heathland in Studland Bay is a nature reserve and an SSSI. What is an SSSI?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Give some examples of wildlife in Studland Bay.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How is Marram Grass adapted to live in Studland Bay?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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