Studies in Detail - Clinical Psychology

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What was the aim of Rosenhan's study?
To see if sane could be distinguished from the insane using the DSM classification system and, if they can be differentiated, how sanity can be classified
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How many pseudo patients did Rosenhan use?
8
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How many hospitals were used?
12
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After the pseudo patients phoned the hospitals, what three words did they say they were hearing?
Empty, Hollow and Thud
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As soon as the pseudo patients were admitted into hospital, what did they do?
Acted completely as themselves
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How did the pseudo patients record information about their time in the hospital?
Using note taking in their diaries
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What were the results from the study?
All of them were admitted into hospital, none were detected as being "sane". All of them but one had a diagnosis of schizophrenic in remission. They stayed in hospital between 7 and 52 days, the average was 19.
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What did Rosenhan conclude?
That staff in psychiatric hospitals were unable to distinguish between the sane and the insane, and that the DSM was not a valid classification system.
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What was Goldstein's aim in his study?
To see if there is any significant difference in the age of onset of schizophrenia between the two sexes, and to see if women have a less severe course of the disorder than men do.
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What did the sample consist of?
199 women and men
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What was the age range of the sample?
18 to 45 years old
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What was common between all of the participants?
They had all been diagnosed with schizophrenia in the 1970's, none had brain disorders or any alcohol problems.
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What did Goldstein do with them 10 years later?
Re-diagnosed every patient using the revised version of the DSM.
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What were the results from this?
Of the 199 patients,169 were re-diagnosed with schizophrenia, 30 were deemed not to be schizophrenic according to the revised version of the DSM.
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Of the 169 re-diagnosed patients, how many were first time admissions?
52
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How many had had one previous hospitalisation?
38, Goldstein studied the remaining participants
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What were the results from the study?
Schizophrenic women had a significantly lower number of re-hospitalisations, and they had shorter stays in hospital over the 10 year period.
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What did Mumford and Whitehouse aim to do in their study?
Based on the fact that very few cases of anorexia or bulimia were reported in non-whites, the aim was to see if eating disorders do actually occur fewer times in British Asian schoolgirls than their white counterpart
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how old were the schoolgirls tested?
14 to 16
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What was the total sample size?
559 - 204 Asians and 355 whites
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What were the girls asked to complete?
Eating attitude test and BSQ (body shape questionnaire)
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What did the girls have to score in order to go through to an interview?
over 20 in the eating attitudes test and over 140 on the BSQ.
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How many girls were interviewed?
22 Asian girls and 32 White girls
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What were the results from the study?
Asian girls had a mean of 10.6 and the white girls had a mean of 7.7
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What did they conclude?
That bulimia nervosa was more prevalent amongst asian schoolgirls than white schoolgirls, which is not what they expected to find. They also found that Asian schoolgirls were more concerned about their weight and the amount of food they ate.
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Card 2

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How many pseudo patients did Rosenhan use?

Back

8

Card 3

Front

How many hospitals were used?

Back

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Card 4

Front

After the pseudo patients phoned the hospitals, what three words did they say they were hearing?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

As soon as the pseudo patients were admitted into hospital, what did they do?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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