Studies for Face Recognition

HideShow resource information
Sadr et al
suggested that eyebrows may be the most important feature
1 of 12
Shepard, Davies and Ellis
Investigates how fatures are used in the description of unfamiliar faces and found that when describing unfamiliar faces pts. referred to; hairs, eyes, nose, mouth, eyebrows, chin and forehead (in that order)
2 of 12
Ellis et al (1979)
descriptions of unfamiliar faces focus more on external feautures, e.g. hair, face shape, whereas internal feautures, e.g. eye, nose, when recalling familiar faces
3 of 12
Bradshaw and Wallace
used an identikit to construct faces, which differed by a fixed number of features. Found that volunteers were quicker to identify that faces differed if the number of different facial features was greater
4 of 12
Woodhead et al
Feauture based training course, refutes feature analysis, found that perhaps faces are stored as wholes rather than a collection of feautres
5 of 12
Yin (1969)
Found it was diffcult to recognise inverted faces- refutes feature analysis
6 of 12
Young and Hay (1986)
cut out pics of famous faces horizontally and checked the pts could recognise the seperate halves. the used to different faces to make a new composite. found that pts found it more difficult as the composite seemed to produce a new holistic face
7 of 12
Prosogpagnosia and Capgras syndrome
No difficulty in naming and describing indv. features of familiar faces but can't recgonise them therefore suggesting face recognition is holistic
8 of 12
Hay and Young (1982)
familiar faces are stored in the brain in neural circuits known as FRUs
9 of 12
Bruce and Young (1986)
Holistic Forms model
10 of 12
Young et al
20 volunteers asked to keep a diary of any errors they made,1008 incidents were recorded; a)failure to recognise a familiar person (114), b) misidentifying one person as another (314), c) recognising a person d) can't remember a name(190)
11 of 12
Tanaka and Farah
'Larry,' answers were more accurate when asked the question 'which is Larry?' instead of 'which i Larry's nose,' suggesting face recognition is holistic
12 of 12

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Investigates how fatures are used in the description of unfamiliar faces and found that when describing unfamiliar faces pts. referred to; hairs, eyes, nose, mouth, eyebrows, chin and forehead (in that order)

Back

Shepard, Davies and Ellis

Card 3

Front

descriptions of unfamiliar faces focus more on external feautures, e.g. hair, face shape, whereas internal feautures, e.g. eye, nose, when recalling familiar faces

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

used an identikit to construct faces, which differed by a fixed number of features. Found that volunteers were quicker to identify that faces differed if the number of different facial features was greater

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Feauture based training course, refutes feature analysis, found that perhaps faces are stored as wholes rather than a collection of feautres

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Cognition and Law resources »