Structural and Functional Brain Anatomy

HideShow resource information
What are the six parts of the brain?
Anterior (front), posterior (back), superior/ dorsal (top), inferior/ ventral (bottom), and lateral (right and left).
1 of 32
What are the three orientations of slices?
Axial, coronal and sagittal.
2 of 32
What is the purpose of the corpus calllosum?
Connects the two hemispheres.
3 of 32
What is the cerebral cortex?
Made of neurons.
4 of 32
Where are grey and white matter situated?
Grey matter is on the outer part, white matter is under the grey matter and is made of axons.
5 of 32
What is a gyrus?
A plateau on the cortical surface.
6 of 32
What is a sulcus?
A fold in the cortical surface.
7 of 32
What is intercallosal transfer?
Electrical impulses travelling between hemispheres.
8 of 32
What are the four lobes of the brain?
Occipital, frontal, parietal and temporal.
9 of 32
What kind of functions transcend the boundaries between lobes?
High order functions.
10 of 32
What is cytoarchitecture?
The structure of cells in the brain.
11 of 32
What is the reticular formation?
A complex network of cells in the core of the brain-stem, involved in the control of arousal and sleep.
12 of 32
What is the suprachiasmatic nucleus?
It controls the circadian rhythm (body clock).
13 of 32
What is the ventromedial nucleus?
It controls the conversion of blood glucose into body fat.
14 of 32
What is phrenology?
The method of localising mental processes anatomically.
15 of 32
What is equipotentiality?
The idea that different parts of the brain may be equally involved in cognitive functions.
16 of 32
What is Broca's area and where is it located?
It is in the left interior frontal lobe, and lesions to this area cause deficits in speech production.
17 of 32
What is the pathway for perception of sensory information?
Primary visual/ auditory/ sensory motor areas ---> Secondary sensory areas ---> Association areas.
18 of 32
What is contralateral?
The information from each half of the visual field reaches the opposite side of the brain.
19 of 32
What happens in the primary visual cortex?
The relative spatial positions of features in the visual field are preserved.
20 of 32
What does the 'what' pathway of visual processing do?
Analyses features of the stimulus.
21 of 32
What does the 'where' pathway of visual processing do?
Rapidly detects the stimulus location and motion.
22 of 32
What does the fusiform gyrus do?
It responds to highly complex visual stimuli.
23 of 32
What is prosopagnosia?
When cells in the Fusiform Face Area are damaged or degenerate, causing impaired face recognition.
24 of 32
Which area of the brain exerts direct control over movement?
The primary motor cortex, in the frontal lobe.
25 of 32
What do the pre-motor and supplementary motor areas do?
They plan movement and integrate motor behaviour with other behaviours.
26 of 32
What areas are involved in coordination and timing of movements?
The Basal Ganglia, the Cerebellum and the Substantia Nigra.
27 of 32
What type of memory had been linked to the medial temporal lobe?
Episodic memory.
28 of 32
Where is language localised?
The left hemisphere.
29 of 32
Which brain area expanded the most in the course of evolution?
The lateral frontal cortex.
30 of 32
Why is little brain space dedicated to basic physiological processes?
Because these vital functions are hard-wired in the brain.
31 of 32
What are the issues with non-invasive brain measurement techniques?
They may be spatially inadequate or crude.
32 of 32

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are the three orientations of slices?

Back

Axial, coronal and sagittal.

Card 3

Front

What is the purpose of the corpus calllosum?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the cerebral cortex?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Where are grey and white matter situated?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all PSY1202 resources »