State crime

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: ncs1997
  • Created on: 05-04-15 16:46
What are state crimes?
Green & Ward - illegal or deviant activities perpetrated by or with complicity of state agencies. Includes genocide and war crime. McLaughlin - 4 types of state crime - Political crimes, crime by security, Economic crimes, Social & cultural crimes.
1 of 8
What are the 2 reasons state crime is so serious?
The scale of state crime - e.g. Cambodia up to 2 million people died. The state has a monopoly over violence. The state is the source of law - the state defines what is criminal, so make their own actions not, e.g. Nazi Germany.
2 of 8
What 2 things do most definitions of human rights include?
Natural rights - e.g. the right to life, liberty and free speech. Civil rights - e.g. right to vote, privacy, fair trial and education.
3 of 8
Schwendinger
Should define crime in terms of the violation of basic human rights, rather than the breaking of legal rules.
4 of 8
How can they be criticised?
Cohen - some acts, whilst violating human rights, aren't self-evidently criminal. Also there is disagreement on what are human rights.
5 of 8
What does Cohen argue the spiral denial is?
It's the lengths that the state goes to cover up their crimes. It has 3 stages. 1 - it didn't happen. 2 - If it did happen, it was something else. 3 - Even if it did happen, it was justified.
6 of 8
What are the 5 neutralisation techniques Cohen identifies that the state uses to justify human rights violations.
Denial of victim. Denial of injury. Denial of responsibility. Condemning the condemners. Appeal to a higher loyalty.
7 of 8
Kelman and Hamilton
Argue that individuals are socialised to accept these crimes, and they turn into crimes of obedience. There are 3 features that produce crimes of obedience - authorisation, routinisation and dehumanisation.
8 of 8

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The scale of state crime - e.g. Cambodia up to 2 million people died. The state has a monopoly over violence. The state is the source of law - the state defines what is criminal, so make their own actions not, e.g. Nazi Germany.

Back

What are the 2 reasons state crime is so serious?

Card 3

Front

Natural rights - e.g. the right to life, liberty and free speech. Civil rights - e.g. right to vote, privacy, fair trial and education.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Should define crime in terms of the violation of basic human rights, rather than the breaking of legal rules.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Cohen - some acts, whilst violating human rights, aren't self-evidently criminal. Also there is disagreement on what are human rights.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Crime and deviance resources »