Stalin Post-WW2

When was the Fourth Five Year Plan?
1946 to 1950.
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What were the aims of the Fourth Five Year Plan?
To 'catch up' with the US, to rebuild heavy industry and transport and to revive the Ukraine (one third of expenditure allocated here).
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What was the Fourth Five Year Plan?
Use of extensive reparations from East Germany, maintenance of wartime controls on labour force (long hours, low wages) and 'grand projects' (canals, HEP).
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What were the results of the Fourth Five Year Plan?
USSR became 2nd in industrial capacity to the US, production doubled, urban workforce increased from 67 to 77 million, industry stronger than pre-war and Dnieper Dam in action action by 1947.
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When was the Fifth Five Year Plan?
1951 to 1955.
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What were the aims of the Fifth Five Year Plan?
To continue heavy industry and transport development, and consumer goods, housing and services to receive stronger investment by Malenkov after 1953.
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What was the Fifth Five Year Plan?
Continuation of Fourth Five Year Plan but resources diverted to rearmament during Korean War and after Stalin's death, Malenkov reduced military and heavy industry expenditure.
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What were the results of the Fifth Five Year Plan?
Most growth targets met, national income increased 71% and Malenkov's changes met opposition resulting in his loss of leadership in 1955.
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Who coordinated the FYP's?
Gosplan.
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Give examples of the huge economic strains WW2 put on the USSR?
It destroyed 70% of its industrial capacity, and caused defence budget to increase due to Satellite States and the costs of the emerging Cold Wa.r
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What economic policy came to an end after WW2?
The lend-lease scheme.
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What did Stalin declare in 1947?
He refused to allow Satellite States to receive US Marshall Aid. Instead, he established Cominform and Comicon.
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Give examples of some of the Satellite States.
Poland, Hungary and Romania - this made them politically, economically and military reliant on the USSR.
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What did the creation of the Satellite States cause?
Tension between the capitalist West and communist East. Such tensions led to the emergence of the 'Cold War' in which each side tried to control the other's influence.
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Why did the redistribution of industry in WW2 allow for a broad base in industrial recovery?
The expanded eastern industrial areas permitted the exploitation of new sources of raw material and energy, along with ensuring the devastated and formerly occupied western areas were rebuilt.
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What were the aims of the Fourth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
To force the kolkhozes to deliver agricultural produce, to revive the wheat fields of the Ukraine (though industry priority here) and to 'transform nature' and revitalise barren land.
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What was the Fourth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
Massive state direction with hug quotes for grain and low wages, higher taxes on produce from private plots, private land absorbed in war returned to kolkhozes and tree plantations and irrigation schemes to make land more usable.
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For the Fourth Five Year Plan for agriculture, which scientists' ideas were followed?
Trofim Lysenko.
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What the results of the Fourth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
State procured 70% of 1946 harvest leaving peasants with little, output of kolkhozes increased but not to 1930s levels, lagged behind industry, 50% of output came from private plots and Lysenko's theories were inaccurate and held farming back.
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When was food rationing ended?
1947
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What were the aims of the Fifth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
To continue the Fourth Five Year Plan, plus Khrushchev's intiative to developed 'virgin lands' and built 'atrocities' from 1953.
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What was the Fifth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
High procurement levels maintained and expansion of agriculture in formerly uncultivated areas.
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What were the results of the Fifth Five Year Plan for agriculture?
Agricultural production still behind industry and not yet to level of 1940.
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Who did no one dare contradict?
Lysenko - he remained the leading 'authority' until 1964 - he was an agronomist favoured by Stalin and promoted to Director of Institute of Genetics.
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What had the 'scorched earth' policy resulted in?
Western regions being unable to be farmed after WW2 - only one third of farms were in operation. Also, only one third of farm labour remained, many animals had been destroyed and there was little farming machinery.
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Since the Great Famine, when was the worst famine experienced?
1946
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How much did the 1945 harvest produce?
60% of pre-WW2 harvests.
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How did the number of pigs change?
Increased from 10.4 million to 31.2 million between 1945 and 1950, exceeding pre-war levels.
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How did the number of horses and cattle change?
They increased, but did not exceed pre-war levels. For example, cattle increased to 65.3 million, but pre-war there were 67.1 million.
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What was Comicon?
The Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, established in 1949 in response to Marshall Aid to coordinate economic growth of Satellite States.
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What was Marshall Aid?
Financial aid offered by the US from 1947 to assist in economic recovery.
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What was Cominform?
The Communist Information Bureau, established in 1947 to provide propaganda and establish Soviet control over all communist parties. It was feared by the West but had little effect outside of the Soviet bloc.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What were the aims of the Fourth Five Year Plan?

Back

To 'catch up' with the US, to rebuild heavy industry and transport and to revive the Ukraine (one third of expenditure allocated here).

Card 3

Front

What was the Fourth Five Year Plan?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What were the results of the Fourth Five Year Plan?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

When was the Fifth Five Year Plan?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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