speeches final

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atwood tec 1
• Bibilical allusion • She compares the novelist to God creating the world in Genesis, ‘God started with chaos – dark, without form and void – and so does the novelist’.
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atwood tc 1 analysis
This serves to give the audience more understanding of the point Atwood is trying to convey (how novels are written) by comparing it to a well-known story
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atwood tec 2
• She alludes to the “sensible middle class women” and how, in most literature this doesn’t seem to vary, except of course in the extreme villain.
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Atwood tec 3
This is one of the key values that underpins Atwood’s speech. “Create a flawless character and you create a insufferable one”.
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Atwood tec 3 analysis
There is no depth of character for women, if in fear for undermining feminism or blatant sexism, women have had, Atwood argues, the back seat in literature for a long time.
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Atwood para 1 tec 1
During the time of her address, society was going through a contemporary movement, particularly in regard to feminist views of women in life and art. Atwood was speaking in a period coined by Rebecca Walker as “third-wave feminism”
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Atwood para 2 tec 1
In particular regard to Atwood’s speech, the third wave feminists aimed to abolish gender role expectations and stereotypes which Atwood argues underpins the value of a modern women through the discreet failure of literature.
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Atwood para 2 tec 1 qoute
Atwood uses rhetorical questions “But is it not, today – well, somehow un-feminist – to depict a women behaving badly” linking it to the arguments of Walker and other strong key feminists of the time.
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Atwood para 2 tec 2
Atwood display’s this connection to her audience in inclusive language “ isn’t that what we expected”. The audience would have understood the literary and Biblical allusions used in the speech, and would have related to the examples drawn from Atwood
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Keating context
Delivering the speech in 1992, the speech had a simple nut significant purpose to apologise for the past treatment to the indigenous Australians in a way posed significance and to suggest possible methods towards complete retribution.
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Keating tec 1
Keating highlights the necessity to assume responsibility for the past marginalisation of the Aboriginal community “so we can turn the goals of reconciliation into reality”
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Keating tec 2
Nevertheless, the Redfern Speech uses direct speech and accumulative language of increasing modality as well as multi sensory imagery to compel the Australian public to imagine themselves in the shoes of the dispossessed Indigenous people.
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Keating tec 2 qoute 1
e enumeration “we brought the disease, we commited the murders” evokes empathy through developing a more informed and empathetic understanding of the lasting legacy of such dispossession, in term contribute to the reconciliation between ind and non i
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Keating tec 3 qoute 1
The quote “ that seems to me not only morally indefensible, but bad history“ achieves greater textual integrity as it relates to all audiences through its contrast in language
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Keating intro para 2
Reconciliation is a key term, even for the many who distrust it, because it has set the frame for government efforts in Indigenous relations since it rose to prominence in the early 1990s.
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Keating tec 1 para 2
Keating explores reconciliation as opposed to just an apology through the reoccurring image of hope offered in “if we have a sense of justice… we will forge a new partnership”
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Keating para 2 tec 2
Keating instantiated a grammatical paradigm that has governed subsequent discourse about Aboriginal reconciliation, whatever the motives of the discussants
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Keating para 2 tec 3
He demonstates this most strongly through encouraging empathetic sentiment “we fail to ask- how would I feel if this was done to me?”
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atwood tc 1 analysis

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This serves to give the audience more understanding of the point Atwood is trying to convey (how novels are written) by comparing it to a well-known story

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atwood tec 2

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Atwood tec 3

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