Sonnet 18 notes

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  • Created by: SpadXIII
  • Created on: 10-03-14 13:09
Structure
Shakespearian Sonet: 4 lines, 4 lines, 4 lines, 2 lines;quatrian, quatrain, quatrian, couplet.
1 of 17
Shall I compare thee to a summers day?
Rhetorical question, yes of course.
2 of 17
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
No you are better. Repition, more, adds depth to his assertion. Follows with why you are.
3 of 17
Rough winds do shake the darlings buds of May,
Nature is destructive to beauty. Doesn't care about it.
4 of 17
And summers lease hath all to short a date.
Beauty doesn't last long. Word Choice, 'lease' a fixed period of time. 'date' the specific time that beauty peaks.
5 of 17
Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines,
Personification, sun compared to an eye, gives the impression of a peircing stare.
6 of 17
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
Personification, sun compared to face, as if he doesn't want to look.
7 of 17
And every fair fron fair sometime declines,
Declines into autumn; image of ageing
8 of 17
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
By an accident or time. No one can escape it.
9 of 17
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
'But' signals a change. Oxymoron 'eternal summer' summer can not go on forever. 'shall not fade' beauty will continue forever.
10 of 17
Nor lose possesion of that fair thou ow'st:
Beauty will not be lost.
11 of 17
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade.
Personification, death, death cannot joy in triumph over you. Contrast between light and dark and death and life between this line and previous.
12 of 17
When in eternal lines to time thou growest.
'eternal lines' time. you grow old.
13 of 17
So long as men can breathe or eye's can see,
As long as people are alive.
14 of 17
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
'this' poem. Every time the poem is read life is recreated. This is how his 'eternal summer will not fade.'
15 of 17
Themes.
Beauty immortalised in poetry. Present day obsessed with it. Times destructive nature. Natures destructive power.
16 of 17
Conceit-Extended Metaphor
Comparrison of person to summer.
17 of 17

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Rhetorical question, yes of course.

Back

Shall I compare thee to a summers day?

Card 3

Front

No you are better. Repition, more, adds depth to his assertion. Follows with why you are.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Nature is destructive to beauty. Doesn't care about it.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Beauty doesn't last long. Word Choice, 'lease' a fixed period of time. 'date' the specific time that beauty peaks.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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