Some Facts About How Italian Was Effected Socially, Politically, Ecoomically and Militarily during WW1

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  • Created by: NumNub
  • Created on: 23-09-13 13:59
Why did D'Annunzio want to join WW1?
He saw it as an exhilarating moment, and a chance for Italy to assert itself and win glory
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How many hours a week were Itailian workers doing per week?
75 hours
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Did govermental powers increse or decrease during this period?
Increase
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What happened between the state and the industries?
They developed close links
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What did the Pope say of this war?
He critiasised it for usueless slaughter
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What did Caporette do during this period?
Led to reorganisation, and promised magor social reforms
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How much in debt was Italy by the end of the war (1919)?
85 billion lire
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How much in debt were Italy before the war (1914)?
16 billion lire
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What happened to the Price Index?
It went from 100 in 1914, to 413 in 1919
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What were the rations during the war?
600g of bread, 250g meat and 150g of pasta
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How much were the soliders paid per day?
0.5 lire paid to the solider, and the same to his family
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How much did real wages drop by?
25%
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How many were killed in the bread riots (1917)?
50
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How many Italians were conscripted for the war?
5 million
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How many Italians were wounded during the war?
1 million
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How many Italians during the war?
600,000
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Card 2

Front

How many hours a week were Itailian workers doing per week?

Back

75 hours

Card 3

Front

Did govermental powers increse or decrease during this period?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happened between the state and the industries?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What did the Pope say of this war?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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