Sociology theorists and their beliefs

  • Created by: Cmah2000
  • Created on: 02-01-18 20:56
Murdock (Functionalist)
• Functions of family; Sexual, Reproduction, economic and socialisation
1 of 49
Murdock (Functionalist)
• Nuclear family is universal (can be found throughout time and history)
2 of 49
Murdock (Functionalist)
• Explains society using an organic analogy (society is like a body, family is the heart)
3 of 49
Parsons (functionalist)
• Functions of family; Primary socialisation of children and the stabilisation of the adult personality.
4 of 49
Parsons (functionalist)
• Nuclear family emerged with industrialisation
5 of 49
Parsons (functionalist)
• Men and women have different roles that suit their innate tendencies: instrumental (men), expressive (women)
6 of 49
Parsons (functionalist)
• Women act as a ‘warm bath’
7 of 49
Engles (Marxist)
• Monogamy became essential because of the inheritance of private property
8 of 49
Engles (Marxist)
• Nuclear family emerged with capitalism.
9 of 49
Zaretsky (Marxist)
• Family performs ideological functions by offering an apparent ‘haven’. Argues this is largely an illusion, family cannot meet its member’s needs.
10 of 49
Zaretsky (Marxist)
• Family helps prop up capitalism by being a unit of consumption.
11 of 49
Althusser (Marxist)
Althusser (Marxist) • The family is part of the ideological state apparatus – transmitting the idea that capitalism is acceptable.
12 of 49
Oakley (Lib Feminist)
• Criticise Young and Wilmott, argues their claims are exaggerated.
13 of 49
Oakley (Lib Feminist)
• Criticise Young and Wilmott, argues their claims are exaggerated.
14 of 49
Oakley (Lib Feminist)
• In her research found some evidence of husbands helping in the home but no evidence of a trend towards symmetry.
15 of 49
Oakley (Lib Feminist)
• Gender roles are a result of socialisation through canalisation and manipulation.
16 of 49
Oakley (Lib Feminist)
• Women take on a ‘dual burden’
17 of 49
Sharpe (Lib feminist)
• Women’s aspirations have changed – from marriage and children in 1970s to focus on careers in 1990s (has impacted size of family and when women have children)
18 of 49
Fran Ansley (Marx Feminist)
• States women are ‘takers of ****’
19 of 49
Fran Ansley (Marx Feminist)
• Act as a ‘safety valve’ (opposite of the warm bath theory)
20 of 49
Breughal (marx feminist)
• Women act as a reserve army of labour
21 of 49
Duncombe and Marsden
Argue women are expected to not only do a double shift of both housework and paid work, but also a triple shift that includes emotion work.
22 of 49
Germaine Greer (Rad Feminist)
• Creation of all female households will eradicate oppression
23 of 49
Mirrless-Black
women committed by men. Also nearly one in four women has been assaulted by a partner at some time in their life
24 of 49
Mirrless-Black
• Found that one in seven men have been assaulted (By female partner) and one in twenty repeatedly so.
25 of 49
Wilmot and Young
• Conjugal roles (roles taken on by husband and wife) are now more equal, even though they may be different
26 of 49
Delphy and Leonard
Found men had more leisure time. Only 1 in 25 women are head of household, when another adult is present. 57 forms of unpaid labour that women complete
27 of 49
Gershuny
Gershuny Argues women working full time is leading to a more equal division of labour in the home.
28 of 49
Silver and Schor
Silver and Schor • Argue burden of housework on women has decreased • Schor goes as far as to claim that there has been ‘the death of the housewife role.’
29 of 49
Ferri and Smith (Feminists)
Ferri and Smith (Feminists) Found evidence of dual burden, argue increased employment of women outside the home has had little impact on the domestic division of labour.
30 of 49
Dunne
• Argues that the division of labour continues because of deeply ingrained ‘gender scripts.’
31 of 49
Dunne
• In lesbian couples found evidence of symmetry.
32 of 49
Weeks
• Argues that same sex relationships offer greater possibilities of equality because the division of labour is open to negotiation and agreement, and is not based on patriarchal tradition.
33 of 49
Rappoport and Rappoport (postmodernist)
• There are 5 forms of family diversity: organisational (structure and roles), class, culture, cohort and lifecycle.
34 of 49
Rappoport and Rappoport (postmodernist)
• Although families might look nuclear from the outside they vary significantly on the inside.
35 of 49
Eversley and Bonnerjea
• Added on a 6th form of diversity: regional – different types of family/households live in different parts of the UK.
36 of 49
Beck and Beck-Gernshiem (postmodernists)
• Traditional values are becoming less important
37 of 49
Beck and Beck-Gernshiem (postmodernists)
• People have become more individualistic (focusing on themselves and their own development)
38 of 49
Alan and Crown (postmodernists)
• The family is now based on choice. • It does not go through a clear lifecycle.
39 of 49
Smart (personal life perspective)
• Families don’t have to include blood relatives anymore – they are more fluid. Could include pets, friends who are close as family etc.
40 of 49
Berthoud and Beishon
Berthoud and Beishon • Found high number of single parent households among afro-Caribbean families.
41 of 49
Chester (newer functionalist)
• Critical of claims of diversity. Thinks the nuclear family is still dominant – calls this ‘neo conventional’ – most people still grow up in and form nuclear families even though gender roles might have changed.
42 of 49
Murray (new right)
• Traditional nuclear family is under threat – welfare benefits are too high, has created a culture of dependency. Sees single parent families as problematic.
43 of 49
Almond (new right)
• Liberalisation of divorce laws has undermined the idea of marriage as a lifelong commitment.
44 of 49
Aries (childhood)
• Childhood did not exist in Medieval times, children were ‘little adults’. 19th century very important for reinforcing the distinction between children and adults
45 of 49
Rogers (childhood)
• Welfare and control view – children are both protected e.g. by laws, but also by regulating their behaviour e.g. having to go to school
46 of 49
Lee (childhood)
• The social construction of childhood has changed – the distinction between adulthood and childhood is now more blurred. Children now have more rights to be heard.
47 of 49
Postman (childhood)
• Childhood is disappearing because the boundary between children’s and adult’s worlds is not distinct.
48 of 49
Punch (childhood)
• Found that once children in Bolivia reach 5, they are expected to take work responsibilities in the home and community.
49 of 49

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

• Nuclear family is universal (can be found throughout time and history)

Back

Murdock (Functionalist)

Card 3

Front

• Explains society using an organic analogy (society is like a body, family is the heart)

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

• Functions of family; Primary socialisation of children and the stabilisation of the adult personality.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

• Nuclear family emerged with industrialisation

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Families and households resources »