Sociology - Social Policy and the Family

Describe direct & indirect effects of laws & policies on the family & give an example for each.
Direct = aimed at family life, e.g. laws on marriage, divorce, child protection, contraception & abortion; Indirect effects = policies on social/economic issues that may affect families, e.g. compulsory schooling.
1 of 10
How do functionalists view social policy & the family?
Society based on value consensus; State acts in interests of the whole of society & policies benefit everyone, e.g. performing the family's functions; Policies improve family life, e.g. looking after members via the NHS.
2 of 10
How do the New Right view the family?
Traditional nuclear family = 'natural' & best; Parents perform role properly = self-reliant family - socialise & care effectively; Opposes diversity - lone-parent & same-sex families damaging to children.
3 of 10
What do the New Right see as the problem & with state policies impacting family life?
Problem = policies may undermine self-reliance by generous benefits, creating a 'dependency culture' (relies on the state); Murray: benefits = 'perverse incentives' - rewarding irresponsible behaviour.
4 of 10
What do the New Right see as the solution to overcoming problems with state policies impacting on family life?
Cutting welfare spending (universal benefits) - more incentive to provide for families.
5 of 10
How have the New Right influenced Conservative government policies? How are they different?
1979-97 = banned homosexuality, set up Child Support Agency; Conservatives divided between modernisers & traditionalists - splits, e.g. over gay marriage (Coalition Gov + Lib Dems, 2010-15 = influence of New Right weakened).
6 of 10
How have the New Right influenced New Labour government policies? How are they different?
Saw married, heterosexual couple as best for bringing up children; New Labour believe: neo-conventional family best, state intervention can improve life, civil partnerships for same-sex couples.
7 of 10
How do feminists view social policy & the family?
Policies often define/shape family life to benefit men & maintain patriarchy; Policies assume patriarchy to be the norm - reproduce family type due to self-fulfilling prophecy, e.g. maternity leave>paternity leave reinforces responsibility for child.
8 of 10
Describe the 2 types of gender regimes in social policies.
Familistic = assume traditional gender roles; Individualistic = treat husbands & wives the same.
9 of 10
Explain the view on changes in gender regimes & gender equality, & explain other trends relating to the state & the market.
Europe moving towards individualistic regimes, but no 'march of progress' towards gender equality; Since global recession - cutbacks in spending = pressure on women for caring; Trend towards neoliberal welfare policies - use market rather than state.
10 of 10

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How do functionalists view social policy & the family?

Back

Society based on value consensus; State acts in interests of the whole of society & policies benefit everyone, e.g. performing the family's functions; Policies improve family life, e.g. looking after members via the NHS.

Card 3

Front

How do the New Right view the family?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What do the New Right see as the problem & with state policies impacting family life?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What do the New Right see as the solution to overcoming problems with state policies impacting on family life?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Families and households resources »