Social Policy and the Family

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  • Created by: Anna
  • Created on: 10-04-14 18:41
What are social policies?
The measures taken by state bodies such as schools and welfare agencies. They are usually based on laws introduced by government.
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Laws and policies have indirect and direct effects on the family, what are indirect and direct effects?
Direct effects are policies aimed specifically at family e.g. laws on divorce, child protection and abortion. Indirect effects are policies on other social or economic issues also affect the family e.g.compulsory schooling provides childcare.
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What do functionalist think about social policy?
Functionalists see society as based on value consensus. The state acts in the interests of the whole society and it's policies help everyone. Policies help the family to perform it's functions- socialising children etc.
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What is an example of 'the march of progress view' they take?
The welfare state enables families to look after their members better, through access to the NHS etc.
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What is New right's problem with social policies?
They undermine the family's self reliance by providing generous benefits e.g. to lone parent families.- results in dependency culture.
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What does Murray (1984) argue?
He sees benefits as 'perverse incentives' rewarding irresponsible behaviour.
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What is new rights solution?
Cutting welfare spending, this will give fathers an incentive to provide for their families.
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How do New Labour differ from the New Right?
It's more accepting of family diversity and believes some policies can improve family life.
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What do feminists believe about social policies?
Social policies often shape or define family life in ways that benefit men and maintaining patriarchy, disadvantaging women.
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What does Land (1978) argue?
Policies often assume the patriarchal family to be them norm, as a result the self-fulfilling prophecy occurs. E.g. maternity leave is longer than paternity leave, reinforcing women's responsibility for childcare.
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what doe marxists believe about social policies?
They benefit the borgeousie.
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Card 2

Front

Laws and policies have indirect and direct effects on the family, what are indirect and direct effects?

Back

Direct effects are policies aimed specifically at family e.g. laws on divorce, child protection and abortion. Indirect effects are policies on other social or economic issues also affect the family e.g.compulsory schooling provides childcare.

Card 3

Front

What do functionalist think about social policy?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is an example of 'the march of progress view' they take?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is New right's problem with social policies?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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