Situation Ethics

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: ElizaJack
  • Created on: 22-02-16 17:33
What did he think unwise?
Casuistry rules.
1 of 28
What are Natural Moral Laws deduced from?
The perceived divine purpose for individual acts and objects.
2 of 28
What did Fletcher propose?
An agapeistic calculus.
3 of 28
How is it not absolutist?
A framework aiming to inform a situation with compassion.
4 of 28
What would any attempt to apply a general rule to a specific situation overrule?
The interests of individuals. An action is judged on the extent to which it helps people.
5 of 28
Why should the interests of people be kept at heart?
The Christian God is a personal God through conscience.
6 of 28
What is a strength of love?
Universal.
7 of 28
Does the end justify the means?
Yes.
8 of 28
What could love refer to?
Biological attraction associated with the identification of a mate for the continuation of the genetic code.
9 of 28
How did Fletcher criticise antinomianism?
Intuition, no laws or principles can lead to anarchical chaos.
10 of 28
What is legalism?
Laws on which a series of commentaries develop enabling them to be applied to new situations. Operated by Pharisees in first-century Palestine.
11 of 28
How did Fletcher critique it?
Cannot cope with technological advances e.g stem cells.
12 of 28
What did he think?
Neither extreme is viable. Ethics must be based on love.
13 of 28
How is it similar to utilitarianism?
Teleological. Replaces pleasure with agape.
14 of 28
Give a criticism of situationalism.
Experience and the wider picture could be overlooked.
15 of 28
What is a downfall of individualism?
Does not provide collective ethical framework.
16 of 28
How is it absolutist?
Rule.
17 of 28
What is problematic in his definition of a situation?
Who is considered?
18 of 28
What is problematic about love?
People may disagree, there is no way of supporting one interpretation over another. Subjective.
19 of 28
What is problematic about teleology?
Consequences can be difficult to predict.
20 of 28
What is another weakness?
A loving thing may not be the right thing.
21 of 28
How does human nature weaken this theory?
Humans are selfish.
22 of 28
What did Tillich argue in Morality and Beyond?
Proportionalism.
23 of 28
What is proportionalism?
A stance between a situationalist and legalistic position because a lack of rules would cause everyone to reevaluate their morality which is impossible to maintain. Natural law should not be overruled without a proportional reason.
24 of 28
What do proportionalists distinguish between?
What is good and what is right because it is possible to have good intentions but must be viewed in context.
25 of 28
What does Hoose argue?
Consequences must be considered, rather than just intuition. Must weigh intrinsic good and bad against the consequences so is situationalist.
26 of 28
What is the Veritatis Splendor?
Sets out Roman Catholic moral teaching. Issued by Pope John Paul II in 1993. Criticises developments in moral relativism. Upholds objective moral truths.
27 of 28
Give a quote.
"lost the sense of the transcendent". Places moral truth with the Church, natural law and splendor of God's truth.
28 of 28

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are Natural Moral Laws deduced from?

Back

The perceived divine purpose for individual acts and objects.

Card 3

Front

What did Fletcher propose?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How is it not absolutist?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What would any attempt to apply a general rule to a specific situation overrule?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Ethics resources:

See all Ethics resources »See all Situation Ethics resources »