Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Quotes and definitions

  • Created by: Alasdair
  • Created on: 07-06-18 16:49
Built environment (A)
(p. 3) 'It was Benefit Night for the White Horse Club, and the pub had burst its contribution box and spread a riot through its rooms and between its four walls.
1 of 45
Built environment (B)
Floors shook and windows rattled, and leaves of aspidistras wilted in the fumes of beer and smoke.'
2 of 45
Natural environment (A)
(P. 72) 'Rain and sunshine, rain and sunshine, with a blue sky now on the following Sunday, and full clouds drifting like an aerial continent of milk-white mountains above the summit of Castle Rock,...
3 of 45
Natural environment (B)
'... a crowned, brownstone, shaggy lion-head slouching its big slouching its big snout out the city, poised as if to gobble up uncouth suburbs hemmed in by an elbow of the turgid Trent.'
4 of 45
Noise - p 26 (A)
'Machines with their own small motors started with a jerk and a whine under the shadows of their operators, increasing a noise that made the brain reel and ache because the weekend had been too tranquil by contrast, ....
5 of 45
Noise - p 26 (B)
'....a weekend that had terminated for Arthur in fishing for trout in the cool shade of a willow-sleeved canal near the Balloon Houses, miles away from the city.'
6 of 45
Noise - p 155
'He walked towards Slab Square, his bones aching for the noise of a public house [....].'
7 of 45
Noise - p 170 (A)
'They heard the thumping pistons of red-painted engines that gave power to Caterpillars and Noah's Arks, and distant screams came down at them from the tower of Helter Skelter and the topmost arc of the Big Wheel, ...
8 of 45
Noise - p 170 (B)
'...noise and lights a magnetised swamp sucking people into it for miles around.'
9 of 45
Noise - p 172 (A)
'Sanity was out of reach: they were caught up in balloons of light and pleasure that would not let them go.'
10 of 45
Noise - p 172 (B)
'The four-acre fair became a whole world, with tents and caravans, stalls and roundabouts, booths and towers, swingboats and engines and big wheels, and a crowd that had lost all idea of time and place looked in the belly of its infernal noise.'
11 of 45
Quiet - p. 138 (A)
'And sitting on the canal bank below Hemlock Stone and the Bramcote Hills he cast out his line over the narrow sleeve of still water, with elderberry leaves bending across from the opposite bank and white cloud-edges moving above green branches.
12 of 45
Quiet - p. 139 (B)
'It was a quiet and passion-less place to be, where few people passed, hemmed in by steep bush-covered banks of a cutting against which, by the towpath, lay his bicycle. There was no sign of the city.
13 of 45
Quiet - p. 139 (C)
'It lay four miles over the hills, yet distant enough when measured by silence and peace as he sat with a cigarette between his fingers [....].'
14 of 45
Quiet - p. 225 (A)
'He held her fast around the waist, and was cast into sad reflection by staring at the water below, a rippleless surface where minnows swam gracefully in calm transparent silence.
15 of 45
Quiet - p. 225 (B)
'White and blue sky made islands on it, so that the descent into its hollows seemed deep and fathomless, and fishes swam over enormous gulfs and chasms of cobalt blue.
16 of 45
Quiet - p. 225 (C)
'Arthur's eyes were fixed into the beautiful earth-bowl of the depthless water, trying to explore each pool and shallow until, as well as an external silence there was a silence within himself that no particle of his mind or body wanted to break.'
17 of 45
Quiet - p. 234
'He spoke to her softly, and she nodded her head to his words without knowing what they meant. Neither did Arthur know what he was saying: both transmission and reception were drowned, and they broke through the opened furrows of the earth.'
18 of 45
Local situation - p. 113 (A)
'After the ten o 'clock turnout of public houses Canning Circus gave in to its curfew and became silent. Late cars changed gear as they ascended the hill, showed their dark snouts upon circling the island at the top, ...
19 of 45
Local situation - p. 113 (B)
'....then disappeared into the oblivion of an opposite road. A moon illuminated the island's flowerless garden, and the junction's green lamp-poles were dimly lighted in comparison to such lunar brilliance.'
20 of 45
Global situation - p. 113
'Arthur and Fred walked by the almshouses talking about war, Fred gesticulating as he threw out his opinions on tactics, fluently comparing Korea to Libya, mountain to desert, "human seas" to tanks.'
21 of 45
Violence - p. 119-20 (A)
'Fred walked steadily, but Arthur still held his arm. They turned on to Hartley Road, between a chhurch and a school, both buildings standing deserted like unwanted corpses.
22 of 45
Violence - p. 119-20 (B)
'Fred said he would like to fix his fingers around somebody's throat, any human throat, as long as he could press down hard and kill. [...] Brakes screeched, and he leapt out of the way, feeling Arthur fall forward as he pulled his arm.
23 of 45
Violence - p. 119-20 (C)
'Arthur was too late. A hammer blow caught his thigh, a companion piece knocked him in the side, a hard sharp corner scratched his lagging hand, and he flattened on the road, palms and face pressed on to a solid cold surface, ...
24 of 45
Violence - p. 119-20 (D)
'...so that he felt as if a coal fire had been rammed into the back of his throat.'M
25 of 45
Misogyny - p. 157 (A)
'Another thing about young women was - though here you weren't always so right - that you could tell from her face, even if she was dressed in a voluminous coat, the size and shape of her breasts.
26 of 45
Misogyny - p. 157 (B)
'With a tight-lipped whippet-faced talkative woman they were as flat as porridge-plates or tinier than pheasants eggs, but with an open-mouthed cheeky-faced, laughing woman you always had something to get hold of.
27 of 45
Misogyny - p. 157 (C)
'The still-waters-run-deep women were often hardest to solve in this matter: mostly they turned out well, but if by chance they didn't then they made up for it in passion.'
28 of 45
Misogyny - p. 35 (A)
'Time flies and no mistake, and it's about time it did because I've doe another two hundred and I'm ready to go home and get some snap and read the 'Daily Mirror' or look at what's left of the bathing tarts in the 'Weekend Mail'.
29 of 45
Misogyny - p. 35 (B)
'But Brenda, I can't wait to get at her. It serves you right, duck, for being so lush and loving.'
30 of 45
Identity: the working-class hero
Writing against the working-class man as 'nobody'
31 of 45
Identity: the working-class hero - p. 147
'I'm me and nobody else; and whatever people think I am or say I am, that's what I'm not, because they don't know a bloody thing about me.'
32 of 45
Identity: the working-class hero - p. 236
'As soon as you were born you were captured by fresh air that you screamed against the minute you came out. Then you were roped in by a factory, had a machine slung around your neck, and then you were hooked up by the **** with a wife.'
33 of 45
Identity: the working-class hero
Who is the novel (or Arthur Seaton) addressing when he reverts to 'us' and 'them'? He describes himself as ''Fighting with mothers and wives, landlords and gaffers, coppers, army, government'
34 of 45
Working-class issues - p. 220 (A)
'Once a rebel, always a rebel. You can't help being one. You can't deny that. And it's best to be a rebel so as to show 'em it don't pay to try to do you down.
35 of 45
Working-class issues - p. 220 (B)
'Factories and labour exchanges and insurance offices keep us alive and kicking - so they say - but they're booby-traps and will **** you under like sinking-sands if you're not careful.
36 of 45
Working-class issues - p. 220 (C)
'Factories sweat you to death, labour exchanges talk you to death, insurance and income tax offices milk money from your wage packets and rob you to death.
37 of 45
Working-class issues - p. 220 (D)
'And if you're still left with a tiny bit of life in your guts after all this boggering about, the army calls you up and you get shot to death. Ay, by God, it's a hard life if you don't weaken, if you don't stop that ******* government from...
38 of 45
Working-class issues - p. 220 (E)
'grinding your face in the muck, though there ain't much you can do about it unless you start making dynamite to blow their four-eyed clocks to bits.'
39 of 45
Working-class issues - David Craig
'Arthur's militancy is not political [...] but rather the aggressive side of a general relish for life that we might call "heartiness" if that word hadn't been ruined.'
40 of 45
Arthur Seaton's 'politics' - p. 32 (A)
'I don't believe in share and share alike, Jack. Tek them blokes as spout on boxes outside the factory sometimes. I like to her 'em talk about Russia, about farms and power-stations they've got, because it's interestin', ...
41 of 45
Arthur Seaton's 'politics' - p. 32 (B)
'but when they say that when they get in government everybody's got to share and share alike, then that's another thing. I ain't a communist I tell you. I like 'em though, because they're different from these big fat Tory bastards in parliament.
42 of 45
Arthur Seaton's 'politics' - p. 32 (C)
'And them Labour bleeders too. They rob our wage packets every week with insurance and income tax and try to tell us it's all for our own good.
43 of 45
Arthur Seaton's 'politics' - p. 32 (D)
'I know what I'd like to do with the government I'd like ter go round every factory in England with books and books of little numbers and raffle of the 'Ouses o' Parliament, 'Sixpence a time, lads', I'd say, 'A nice big 'ouse for the winner'
44 of 45
Arthur Seton's 'politics' - p 32 (E)
... - and then when I'd made a big packet I'd settle down somewhere with fifteen women and fifteen cars, that I would.'
45 of 45

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Floors shook and windows rattled, and leaves of aspidistras wilted in the fumes of beer and smoke.'

Back

Built environment (B)

Card 3

Front

(P. 72) 'Rain and sunshine, rain and sunshine, with a blue sky now on the following Sunday, and full clouds drifting like an aerial continent of milk-white mountains above the summit of Castle Rock,...

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

'... a crowned, brownstone, shaggy lion-head slouching its big slouching its big snout out the city, poised as if to gobble up uncouth suburbs hemmed in by an elbow of the turgid Trent.'

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

'Machines with their own small motors started with a jerk and a whine under the shadows of their operators, increasing a noise that made the brain reel and ache because the weekend had been too tranquil by contrast, ....

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English resources:

See all English resources »See all Regional Writers resources »