Sampling

HideShow resource information
Random Sampling
Every member of the population has an equal chance of being chosen. Identify everyone in the target population and selecting the number of participants you need in a way that everyone has an equal chance of being chosen
1 of 18
Systematic Sampling
Number the participants in your sampling frame and then pick participants at a set interval
2 of 18
Stratified Sampling
Classifying the population into categories and then choosing a sample which consists of participants from each category in the same proportions as they are in the population
3 of 18
Quota Sampling
Classifying the population into categories and then asking people who fit into those categories to go in to those categories to be participants. When have right proportion of each, stop recruiting for category
4 of 18
Opportunity Sampling
Taking the sample from people who are available at the time the study is being carried out and fit the criteria you're looking for
5 of 18
Snowball Sampling
Finding one member of the group and asking them if they know anyone else who could take part, and then asking those people for more
6 of 18
Self-selected/ Volunteer Sampling
Participants becoming part of a study because they volunteer when asked or in response to an advert
7 of 18
Purposive Sampling
The researcher when short of time may seek participants who are available but also appropriate for the purpose of the research
8 of 18
Advantage of Random & Systematic Sampling
Most representative as it relies in statistical odds
9 of 18
Disadvantage of Random & Systematic Sampling
Large sample needed to ensure that statistically it's likely to be representative
10 of 18
Advantage of Stratified Sampling
Relatively small sample can be used with confidence that it's still representative
11 of 18
Disadvantage of Stratified Sampling
Requires sampling frame which includes details of significant characteristics of population being studied
12 of 18
Advantage of Quota Sampling
Advantages of stratified random sampling but can be conducted without variables being available from sampling frame
13 of 18
Disadvantage of Quota Sampling
Accessibility of potential respondents affects their chances of being included in the sample. May be less representative than random and stratified random sampling
14 of 18
Advantage of Snowballing Sampling
Used mainly with groups who are hard to identify or access (e.g. criminals)
15 of 18
Disadvantage of Snowballing Sampling
Very unlikely to be truly representative since based on people who have contact with one another
16 of 18
Advantage of Opportunity Sampling (Volunteer & Purposive)
Tends to be easiest, cheapest and quickest way of collecting a sample and may lead to a good response rate
17 of 18
Disadvantage of Opportunity Sampling (Volunteer & Purposive)
Makes no attempt to be truly representative, so can't generalise from the findings
18 of 18

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Systematic Sampling

Back

Number the participants in your sampling frame and then pick participants at a set interval

Card 3

Front

Stratified Sampling

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Quota Sampling

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Opportunity Sampling

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Sociological research methods resources »