Sallust Jugurtha- chapter 8

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  • Created by: Lydia22
  • Created on: 04-07-17 16:39
Ea tempestate in exercitu nostro fuere complures novi atque nobiles, quibus divitiae bono honestoque potiores erant,
At that time in our army there were numerous new men and nobles for whom riches were more an influential consideration than goodness and honourableness;
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factiosi domi, potentes apud socios, clari magis quam honesti, qui Iugurthae non mediocrem animum pollicitando accendebant, si Micipsa rex occidisset, fore uti solus imperi Numidiae potiretur:
Factious at home, influential with the allies, distinguished rather than honourable, they fired Jugurtha’s by no means average mind with the repeated promise that, if king Micipsa died, he alone would acquire command of Numidia:
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in ipso maximam virtutem, Romae omnia venalia esse.
In him there was the greatest prowess, they said, and at Rome everything was for sale.
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Sed postquam Numantia deleta P. Scipio dimittere auxilia et ipse reverti domum decrevit, donatum atque laudatum magnifice pro contione Iugurtham in praetorium abduxit ibique secreto monuit,
But after P. Scipio, on the destruction of Numantia, had decided to dismiss his auxiliaries and to return home himself, he made a magnificent presentation and speech of praise to Jugurtha before the assembled army, and then led him away to his HQ and
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(...)
there warned him in secret
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ut potius publice quam privatim amicitiam populi Romani coleret neu quibus largiri insuesceret:
that he should cultivate the friendship of the Roman people through official rather than private channels and should not acquire the habit of bribing people.
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periculose a paucis emi quod multorum esset. Si permanere vellet in suis artibus, ultro illi et gloriam et regnum venturum; sin properantius pergeret, suamet ipsum pecunia praecipitem casurum.
It was dangerous to buy from a few what belonged to the many. If he was prepared to persevere with his own qualities, then glory and kingship would come to him of their own accord; but, if he moved forward too fast, his very own money would cause him
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(...)
a precipitate fall.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Factious at home, influential with the allies, distinguished rather than honourable, they fired Jugurtha’s by no means average mind with the repeated promise that, if king Micipsa died, he alone would acquire command of Numidia:

Back

factiosi domi, potentes apud socios, clari magis quam honesti, qui Iugurthae non mediocrem animum pollicitando accendebant, si Micipsa rex occidisset, fore uti solus imperi Numidiae potiretur:

Card 3

Front

In him there was the greatest prowess, they said, and at Rome everything was for sale.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

But after P. Scipio, on the destruction of Numantia, had decided to dismiss his auxiliaries and to return home himself, he made a magnificent presentation and speech of praise to Jugurtha before the assembled army, and then led him away to his HQ and

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

there warned him in secret

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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