Routes of Administration

Intravenous
An aqueous solution that is isotonic with blood is directly injected into the vein. It can be a single injection for a small volume or a slow drip infusion for a large volume
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Intramuscular
An aqueous or oily solution or suspension injected into the skeletal muscles. Aqueous solution = rapid onset; oily solution = slow, depot effect; oily suspension = sustained drug release
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Subcutaneous
Aqueous solution or suspension into loose tissue under the dermis. Isotonicity not critical but they do reduce pain at site of administration
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Intraarterial
An aqueous solution that is isotonic with blood is directly injected into an artery (rarely used)
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Intradermal
An injection between the epidermal and dermal layers on the skin. Only a small amount administered and may leave a bump. Drug absorption is slow. Example: BCG vaccine
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Intracardiac
An injection into the heart chamber. Example: adrenaline during cardiac arrest
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Intrathecal
An injection into the cerebrospinal fluid to deliver a high concentration of drug to the brain and spinal cord. Example: methotrexate for meningeal leukemia
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Intraarticular
An injection into the synovial cavity of a joint. It uses viscous fluid and is very painful. Example: corticosteroids for inflammation
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Intracavernosal
An injection into the corpous cavernosum of the penis. Example: caverject for erectile dysfunction
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Intravitreal
An injection into the eye for, e.g. conditions resulting from diabetes
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

An aqueous or oily solution or suspension injected into the skeletal muscles. Aqueous solution = rapid onset; oily solution = slow, depot effect; oily suspension = sustained drug release

Back

Intramuscular

Card 3

Front

Aqueous solution or suspension into loose tissue under the dermis. Isotonicity not critical but they do reduce pain at site of administration

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

An aqueous solution that is isotonic with blood is directly injected into an artery (rarely used)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

An injection between the epidermal and dermal layers on the skin. Only a small amount administered and may leave a bump. Drug absorption is slow. Example: BCG vaccine

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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