Response to Symptoms - Pain

  • Created by: LBCW0502
  • Created on: 16-10-18 11:10
What are the some of the issues with healthcare?
Patients wait too long for an appointment with the GP. Pharmacies do not educate patients about self-care. Patients not sure when to go to a GP or pharmacist
1 of 38
What is patient centred care?
Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions
2 of 38
Describe features of goof patient consultation?
Listen to the patient, give the patient options, provide information about health, involve the patient in decision making
3 of 38
Summarise features of patient centred care
Treat patients as equal partners in decisions, put patients at centre of all decisions, show respect, trust/compassion/dignity/empathy, choice/influence, good communication, holistic view, product/patient centric
4 of 38
What is MAS?
Minor Ailments Scheme - treat minor ailments without Rx or visiting GP. Patient assessment by pharmacist, provision of advice, provision of medication from agreed formulary appropriate for condition. Acute need, patient exempt from NHS Rx charge
5 of 38
What are the aims of the RTS consultation framework?
Adapted from MRCF to support brief OTC interventions, provides clear/logical structure, tailored for patient centred care, key activities/behaviours for each stage, method of evaluating pharmacist, peer/self-direct, CPD
6 of 38
Outline the RTS consultation framework
Scene setting - information gathering and problem identification - actions/solutions - closing - consultation behaviours
7 of 38
Describe features of scene setting
Build a therapeutic relationship (e.g. introduction). Consider who you are talking to (e.g. patient, culture, language), location, why patient has come to the pharmacy, mutual understanding
8 of 38
Describe features of information gathering and problem identification
Identify medical/pharmaceutical care needs. Symptoms, age, length of illness, patient's understanding of illness, PMH, allergies, pregnant/breast feeding, SH, prioritise pharmaceutical issues
9 of 38
What does WWHAM stand for?
Who is the medicine for? What are the symptoms? How long have the symptoms been present? What Action has already been taken? Medication? - listen to patient answers before asking more questions
10 of 38
What does ASMETHOD stand for?
Age, Self, Medication, Extra medicines, Time persisting, History, Other symptoms, Danger symptoms
11 of 38
Describe features of actions and solutions
Confirm/explain diagnosis, involve patient when designing management plan, appropriate treatment, information about type of medicine, give advice, self-care, check patient's ability/adherence, check patient's understanding, refer to other HCPs
12 of 38
Describe features of timescales and monitoring
How long should the patient take the medicine? When will they notice improvement/or not? What are the side effects? What should they do if their condition does not improve? What if it recurs? Is there anything else they can do (self-care)?
13 of 38
Describe features of the GROW model
Goal (what do you want)? Reality (where are you now?) Options (what could you do?) WIll (what will you do?)
14 of 38
Describe features of patient referral
Patient groups (pregnant women, elderly, children). Signposting. Communication. Time scales
15 of 38
Describe features of closing
Explain who to do if patient has difficulties to follow plan/who to contact, offer opportunity to ask questions
16 of 38
Describe features of consultation behaviours
Listen, demonstrate empathy, use body language, logical approach, summarise information and time points, manage time effectively
17 of 38
Describe features of communication skills
Two way communication, questioning styles, consider cultural differences, listen actively, let patient ask questions
18 of 38
Why is it important to talk to a patient about their prescribed medication?
Patient safety, ADRs (consequences)
19 of 38
Describe features of medicine adherence
Aid patient well being, reduce medicine waste. Unintentional (lack of knowledge about medicine). Intentional (refuse to take medicine e.g. culture/beliefs)
20 of 38
Describe features of Summary Care Records
Electronic patient summary containing clinical information e.g. allergies, ADRs, patient consent, assists with emergency supply etc. Potential benefits - increased patient safety, efficiency, effectiveness
21 of 38
What are the key points of patient education?
Educate patients in friendly language. Check with patient (info from prescriber/what they know). Before giving info (check if patient has had medicine before, effects/allergies, current medication), ask patient if they want more info, refer to PIL
22 of 38
What are the two main types of pain?
Acute (injury, less than 3 months) and chronic (longer than 3 months, impacts normal functioning)
23 of 38
Give examples of pain assessment scales
Verbal pain intensity, visual analog scale, 0-10 numeric pain intensity scale, faces scale, pain ladder, pain assessment model
24 of 38
What does SOCRATES stand for?
Site. Onset. Character. Radiates. Associated symptoms. Time. Exacerbating. Severity
25 of 38
Give examples of OTC analgesics
Paracetamol, aspirin, codeine, dihydrocodeine, combination products, Ibuprofen etc. Choose appropriate OTC e.g. children, pregnancy, breast-feeding
26 of 38
What are the five commonly abused OTC medicines?
Codeine based medicines, cough products, sedating antihistamines, decongestants, laxatives
27 of 38
Which types of headaches are treated by pharmacists?
Primary headaches (and some secondary headaches)
28 of 38
What are the common types of primary headaches?
Cluster, tension and migraine (referral for patients with cluster headaches - red flag)
29 of 38
Which secondary headaches could be treated by pharmacists?
Infections e.g. sinusitis, referred dental pain, medication overuse, hormonal, medication ADRs, alcohol induced (hangover)
30 of 38
What are the symptoms of secondary headaches?
Systemic symptoms (fever, weight loss), secondary factors (e.g. HIV, cancer), neurologic symptoms, onset, older, previous headache history
31 of 38
What are the types of headache common to OTC?
Migraine (one side), sinus (around eyes, cheekbones), tension (across forehead), cluster (around the eye/ice pick headache)
32 of 38
What are the treatments for tension type headaches?
Paracetamol, NSAIDs, compound analgesia (codeine/dihydrocodeine, caffeine, antihistamines) - self care
33 of 38
Which factors can trigger a migraine?
Foods, medications, environmental, lifestyle
34 of 38
What are the treatments for primary dysmenorrhoea?
NSAIDs, ibuprofen, naproxen, self-care signposting etc
35 of 38
Describe general principles of medicines for children
Self-limiting conditions are common, children become sick faster than adults, cannot described symptoms, ensure suitable dose, child-resistant containers/safe storage of medicines, consider dosage measurement
36 of 38
Describe features of sugar vs sugar free-medicines
Sugar free medicines preferred. But sugar contributes to small properties of dietary sugar intake, unlikely to be detrimental to dental health. Sugar free for long term use. Is it specified (OTC or Rx - diabetes?)
37 of 38
Describe features of teething in babies and children
Painful. Management - teething rings, teething gels, homeopathic, analgesics (paracetamol/ibuprofen)
38 of 38

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is patient centred care?

Back

Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions

Card 3

Front

Describe features of goof patient consultation?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Summarise features of patient centred care

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is MAS?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Pharmacy resources:

See all Pharmacy resources »See all Patient Consultations, RTS, CNS, Pain resources »