Respiration and Exercise

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  • Created by: joshd
  • Created on: 14-03-14 17:26
What do muscles need and describe how/why. (1)
Muscles need energy from respiration to contract. When you exercise some of your muscles contract more frequently then normal so you need more energy. This energy comes from increased respiration.
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What does the increase in respiration mean? Heart rate? Removes what? (2)
The increase in respiration means you need to get more oxygen into the cells.
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What does this lead to with breathing? (3)
The breathing rate increases to get more oxygen into the blood, and to get this oxygenated blood around, your heart rate increases. This removes CO2 more quickly at the same times.
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What occurs to deal with the increased demand? (4)
To deal with the increased demand, the rate of diffusion of carbon dioxide and oxygen at the lung surface and in muscle cells increases.
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What happens when one does really vigorous exercises like sprinting?
The body can't supply more oxygen to your muscles quickly enough, so they start respiring anaerobically.
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What is the equation used for respiration (with heart rate)?
CARDIAC OUTPUT = HEART RATE x STOKE VOLUME. (e.g, heart rate = 80 bpm and stoke volume = 70cm3, cardiac output = 80 x 70 = 5600 cm3 per min)
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When does anaerobic respiration happen?
Anaerobic respiration happens when there's not enough oxygen available. (means 'without air').
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What is the overall word equation for anaerobic respiration?
Glucose = Lactic Acid (+ ENERGY)
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Compare aerobic and anaerobic respiration in terms of ENERGY.
Anaerobic does not release as much energy as aerobic respiration (but it's useful in emergencies).
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What does anaerobic respiration produce?
A build-up of lactic acid in the muscles, which gets painful and can give you cramp.
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What is the advantage of anaerobic respiration?
It means that you can keep on using your muscles for a while longer.
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What do you have when you stop exercising (after resorting to anaerobic respiration) and what does this mean ? What is the amount of oxygen required called?
An oxygen debt. This mean you have to 'repay' the oxygen which you didn't manage to get to your muscles in time. The amount of oxygen required is called the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC)
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What does it mean you have to do for a while after you stop exercising? Describe the heart rate.
This means you have to keep breathing hard for a while after you stop to get more oxygen into the blood. Your heart rate also stays high to get the oxygen to your muscles, where it's used to convert the toxic lactic acid to harmless CO2 and water.
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How can you investigate the effect of exercise?
You can measure the breathing rate by counting breaths, and heart rate by taking the pulse.
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Describe the example of taking your pulse and when it could be done. What could be done with the data?
You could take your pulse after: -sitting down for 5 minutes. - then after 5 minutes of gentle walking. - then after 5 minutes of slow jogging. - then after running for 5 minutes. The results can be plotted in a bar chart.
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Describe the trend in pulse rate.
Your pulse rate will increase the more intense the exercise is, as your body needs to get more oxygen to the muscles and take more carbon dioxide away from the muscles.
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How can the pules rate experiment be more reliable?
To make the experiment more reliable, do it as a group and plot the average pulse rate for each exercise.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What does the increase in respiration mean? Heart rate? Removes what? (2)

Back

The increase in respiration means you need to get more oxygen into the cells.

Card 3

Front

What does this lead to with breathing? (3)

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What occurs to deal with the increased demand? (4)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What happens when one does really vigorous exercises like sprinting?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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