Researchers For Addiction

HideShow resource information
Black et al 2006
first degree relatives of a pathological gambler are more likely to be gamblers
1 of 34
blaszczynski et al 1990
poor tolerance to boredom creates gambling, pathological gamblers had significantly higher boredom proneness scores compared to a control group
2 of 34
vink et al 2005
1,572 dutch twin pairs, concordance rate of 44%
3 of 34
Zimmerman 2001
found people hooked on video gambling became compulsive in a year where horses etc took 3, disputing the biological approach
4 of 34
Gartner et al 2009
points out screening for genetic sensitivities to smoking is unsuccessful as no one gene has been outlined in connection to smoking
5 of 34
Gelkopf et al 2002
suggests individuals purposely turn to things to self medicate their psychological issues like using alcohol to numb depression
6 of 34
Gordon 2008
irrational beliefs, people believe they have control and have an exaggerated self esteem, believing they have special skills etc
7 of 34
Blanco et al 2000
recall bias, people often only remember the wins, relapse
8 of 34
Kassel et al 2007
people smoke because they believe it will enhance their mood and relieve stress
9 of 34
Tate et al 1994
told a group of people quitting smoking they shouldn't get side effects and so they experienced less than the control group; people expect bad experiences from quitting
10 of 34
Backbier 1994
people relapse as they see the stress of quitting as outweighing the positives
11 of 34
Moolchan et al 2005
nicotine patches reduce relapse rates better when accompanied by cbt, suggesting its not just purely biological
12 of 34
Griffiths 2009
gamblers playing slot machines continue because of the psychological rewards, getting a buzz and money from winning.
13 of 34
Lambos et al 2007
families and friends of a gambler are more likely to approve of gambling, reinforcing the gambler.
14 of 34
Mayeux 2008
found a positive relationship between smoking and popularity of boys aged 16, which acts as a positive reinforcement
15 of 34
Hogarth et al 2010
found the amount a smoker craved smoking depended on the smoking related stimuli presented to the smoker
16 of 34
Rubinson 1989
adults who have less belief in their ability to quit are more likely to suffer relapse
17 of 34
Finn 2005
supports the role model aspect as people who smoke are 1.88 times more likely to have kids who smoke
18 of 34
Driessen et al 2008
30% of drug users suffered from PTSD, suggesting traumatic stress is a risk factor
19 of 34
Bandura 1977
behaviours are learnt, social learning theory
20 of 34
Abrams and Hogg 1990
Social identity theory, assumes people, especially adolescents adapt to the norms of their social groups
21 of 34
Brown 1997
Social groups have more of an impact on those under 20
22 of 34
Cloniger 1987
three traits that predispose people; novelty seeking (wanting new experiences); Harm avoidance (worrying and pessimistic) and reward dependence (the extent of how quickly a person learns to repeat rewarded behaviours)
23 of 34
Teeson et al 2002
does personality effect addiction or visa versa?
24 of 34
Ajzen 1989
Theory of planned behaviour; Behavioural attitude; subjective norms and perceived behavioural control
25 of 34
Majer et al 2004
investigated cognitive factors and found self efficacy to be prominent, and encouraging an addict's belief in their ability to abstain was linked to positive outsomes
26 of 34
Armitage et al 1999
Theory of planned behaviour is too rational
27 of 34
Klag 2006
points out TPB misses out motivation as people who quit for their children for example, are more likely to refrain from relapse
28 of 34
Hollander et al 2000
found gamblers treated with SSRIs showed significant improvement regarding their gambling addiction compared to a control
29 of 34
Sindelar et al 2007
investigated the effect of rewards on people trying to quit drugs using money rewards, with a control group and a group receiving a random money reward every time they tested negative on a drug test, being 60% more likely to produce a negative test
30 of 34
Stead et al 2006
study of 18,000 people, people were 50% more likely to refrain from relapse if they received a regular phone call from a therapist
31 of 34
Blanco 2002
SSRI's showed no effect on gamblers
32 of 34
Ladouceur 2001
randomly allocated people to a control and a cbt group, 80% of those who completed treatment no longer fitted the DSM criteria for a pathologica gambler
33 of 34
Crits-Christoph 2003
reducing cocaine use lead to a reduction in the contraction of HIV- Real world application
34 of 34

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

poor tolerance to boredom creates gambling, pathological gamblers had significantly higher boredom proneness scores compared to a control group

Back

blaszczynski et al 1990

Card 3

Front

1,572 dutch twin pairs, concordance rate of 44%

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

found people hooked on video gambling became compulsive in a year where horses etc took 3, disputing the biological approach

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

points out screening for genetic sensitivities to smoking is unsuccessful as no one gene has been outlined in connection to smoking

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Addictive behaviour resources »