RESEARCH METHODS PSYCHOLOGY

  • Created by: rosannaaa
  • Created on: 17-03-18 17:33
CASE STUDIES
An in depth investigation, description and analysis of a single individual, event, group or institution.
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CONTENT ANALYSIS
A research technique that enables the indirect study of behaviour by examining communications that people produce. (emails, text, TV)
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CODING
The stage of content analysis where the communication studied is analysed by identifying each instance of the chosen category (words, sentences, phrases)
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THEMATIC ANALYSIS
An inductive and qualitative approach to analysis that involves identifying implicit or explicit ideas within the data. Themes often emerge once the data has been coded.
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RELIABILITY
Refers to how consistent the findings from a investigation or measuring device are. Measuring device is reliable when it produces consistent results every time used.
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TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY
Method of assessing reliability of a questionnaire or psychological test by assessing the same person on two seperate occasions. Shows the extent to which is reliable or not.
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INTER-OBSERVER RELIABILITY
Extent to which there is agreement between two or more observers involved in observations of behaviour. This is measured by correlating the observations of two or more observers.
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VALIDITY
The extent to which an observed effect is genuine - can it be generalised beyond research settings? Does it measure what it is meant to?
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FACE VALIDITY
Basic form of validity, in which a measure is scrutinized to determine whether it appears to measure what it is supposed to measure.
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CONCURRENT VALIDITY
Extent to which a psychological measure relates to existing similar measure.
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ECOLOGICAL VALIDITY
Extent to which findings from research study can be generalised to other settings and situations, form of external validity.
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TEMPORAL VALIDITY
Extent to which findings from research study can be generalised to other historical times and eras. Form of external validity.
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STATISTICAL TESTS
Used to determine whether a significant difference or correlation exists.
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LEVELS OF MEASUREMENT
Quantitative data can be classified into types or levels of measurements such as nominal, ordinal or interval.
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CHI-SQUARED
A test for an association between two variables or conditions. Data should be nominal level using an unrelated design.
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SIGN TEST
A statistic test used to analyse the difference in scores between related items. Data should be nominal or better.
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MANN-WHITNEY
Test of significant difference between the two sets of scores. Data should be at least ordinal level using an unrelated design.
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WILCOXON
A test for signifcant difference between two sets of scores. Data should be at least ordinal level using related design.
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SPEARMANS RHO
A test for correlation when data is interval level.
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PEARSONS R
Parametric test for correlation when data is at interval level.
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RELATED T TEST
Parametric test for difference between 2 sets of scores. Data must be interval with related design.
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UNRELATED T TEST
Parametric test for difference between two sets of scores. Data must be interval with an unrelated design.
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PROBABILITY
Measure of the likelihood that a particular event will occur where 0 indicates statistical impossibility and 1 statistical certainty.
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SIGNIFICANCE
Statistical term that tells us how sure we are that a difference or correlation exists. A significant result means the researcher can reject null hypothesis.
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CRITICAL VALUE
The numberical boundary or cut off point between acceptance an rejection of null hypothesis.
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TYPE I ERROR
The incorrect rejection of a true null hypothesis (false positive).
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TYPE II ERROR
The failure to reject a false null hypothesis. False negative.
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PARADIGM
Set of shared assumptions and agreed methods within scientific discipline.
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PARADIGM SHIFT
The result of scientific revolution: significant change in the dominant unifying theory within scientific discipline.
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OBJECTIVITY
When all sources of personal bias are minimised so as not to distort or influence the research process.
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THE EMPIRICAL METHOD
Scientific approaches based on gathering evidence through direct observation and experience.
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REPLICABILITY
Extent to which scientific procedures and findings can be repeated by other researchers.
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FALSIFIABLILITY
Principle that a theory cannot be considered scientific unless it admits the possibility of being proved untrue.
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A research technique that enables the indirect study of behaviour by examining communications that people produce. (emails, text, TV)

Back

CONTENT ANALYSIS

Card 3

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The stage of content analysis where the communication studied is analysed by identifying each instance of the chosen category (words, sentences, phrases)

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

An inductive and qualitative approach to analysis that involves identifying implicit or explicit ideas within the data. Themes often emerge once the data has been coded.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Refers to how consistent the findings from a investigation or measuring device are. Measuring device is reliable when it produces consistent results every time used.

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Preview of the back of card 5
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