Religion and social protest

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Like Weber, who is interested in the relationship between religion and social change?
Bruce.
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What 2 examples does he use to show the role of religiosity in protest movements?
1. The New Christian Right 2. The Civil rights movement.
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Although slavery was abolished in 1865, blacks were denied...
...legal and political rights in many Southern states where segregation was enforcd
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Who did Bruce describe as the backbone of the movement?
Black clergy.
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Their churches provided...
...meeting places and sanctuary from the threat of white violence.
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Including rituals such as:
Prayer meetings/ hymn singing were a source of unity in the face of oppression.
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Bruce argued that the black clergy were able to shame whites into changing the law by appealing to ...
...their shared Christian values of equality.
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Althoug the impact on white clergy in the South was llimimted, their message...
...reached a wide audience outside the Southern states and gained national support.
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How does Bruce see religion in this context?
As an ideological resource?
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What is an ideological resource?
Something that provides beliefs and practices that protesters can draw on for motivation and support.
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Name an example of a way in which religious organisations are well equipped to support protests and contribute to social change?
Taking the moral highground (For example: Black clergy pointed out the hypocrisy of white clergy who preached 'love thy neighbour' but supported racial segregation.)
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The civil rights movement began in 1955 and ended in...
...1964 (when racial segregation was outlawed).
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Bruce sees the civil rights as an example of religin becoming involved in ...
...secular struggle and helping to bring about change.
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In his view, how did this movement achieve its aim?
It shared the same values as wider society and of those in power.
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For example:
1. In the American constitution it states that all men and women are equal 2. Shaming those in power to put into practice the principle of equality.
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The new christian right is politically and morally..
...conservative.
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It is a fundamentalist protestnat movement that has grew in popularity since the 1960s because of its...
...opposition to the liberalising of american society.
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The aims of the New Christian Right are very...
...ambitious.
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What 3 behaviours did they wish to make illegal?
1. Divorce 2. Abortion 3. Homosexuality.
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In doing this, what is their aim for American culture?
To return it to before the liberalisation of America began.
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It believes in the importance of the traditional family and...
...gender roles.
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What does it campaign for the teaching of in schools?
Creationism (the view that the Bible's account of creation is literally true).
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What does it campaign for the ban of in schools?
Sex education.
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What has the N.R made effective use of with the aim of making converts and recruiting new members?
Media and networking (for example televangelism)
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What is the name of a right-wing Christian pressure group founded in 1978?
The moral majority.
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What political party do they have strenghtening links with?
The republican party.
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However, the moral majority has been largely unsuccessful in 3 reasons?
1. Only 15% of the population at most supports it 2. Its campaigners find out difficult to cooperate with people from other religious groups 3. They are met with strong opposition from groups who stand for freedom of choice (planned parenthood).
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How does the moral majority fail to appeal to wider society's beliefs?
The basic ideas of American society are liberal and democratic (this includes a separation of church and state).
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This means that very few Americans would support the idea of a ...
...theocracy (rule by religous leaders).
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Numerous suverys shows that Americans are comfortable with legalising activities that they personally believe are...
...immoral (such as homosexuality).
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Also, they are unwilling to accept other people's definition of how they should...
...live their lives.
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Why does this pose enormous problems for the new right?
They believe in the literal truth of the bible so insist that everyone should be able to conform to its teachings.
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This is an impossibe demand to make in a...
...mature democracy.
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Card 2

Front

What 2 examples does he use to show the role of religiosity in protest movements?

Back

1. The New Christian Right 2. The Civil rights movement.

Card 3

Front

Although slavery was abolished in 1865, blacks were denied...

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Who did Bruce describe as the backbone of the movement?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Their churches provided...

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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