Quality Management

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What is quality?
A product or service is of good quality if it meets the needs and expectations of the customer.
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What are some examples of customer needs and expectations?
Performance (fit for purpose) Appearance, Availability & delivery, Reliability / Durable, Price / Value for money
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How can quality be measured?
Reliability, Functions & Features, Support levels & Standards, Cost of ownership (TANGIBLE) - Brand Image, Exclusiveness, Market Reputation (INTANGIBLE)
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Why is quality important?
Markets are highly competitive, customers are more knowledgeable & demanding. They are prepared to complain about poor quality & are able to share information of poor quality. Can develop reputation
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How does quality relate to competitiveness?
Fewer businesses are competing solely on price, at similar prices the high-quality product is likely to win. Quality can enable a business to differentiate from competition.
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What are some examples of Poor Quality?
Product fails, Product does not perform as promised, Product is delivered late, Poor instruction / details for use, Unresponsive customer service
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What are some costs of Poor Quality?
Loss of customers, Costs of reworking or remaking, Costs of replacements or refunds, Wasted materials. Competitive disadvantage.
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How does poor quality damage competitiveness?
Financial costs, Lost customer loyalty, damaged business reputation, Need for greater controls and checks, competitors take advantage
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What are the TWO main approaches to quality management?
Quality Control & Quality Assurance
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What is quality control?
The process of inspecting products at the end of the production process, to ensure that they meet required quality standards.
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When does inspection take place in Quality Control?
When raw materials received, Whilst in production process, Finished products
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Disadvantages of Quality Inspection
Costly, too late at end of production process, inconsistent inspections, often not compatible with modern production systems, done by inspectors
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What is Quality Assurance?
The processes that ensure production quality meet the requirements of customers, by building quality into the product instead of inspection.
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Difference between Quality Assurance & Quality Control?
Quality control involves an inspection at end of processes (focuses on outputs) whereas Quality Control focuses on building quality into product (processes)
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What is Total Quality Management (TQM)
A management philosophy committed to focus on continuous improvements of products and services with the involvement of the entire workforce
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What are the advantages of TQM?
Puts customer at heart of production process, Motivational since workers feel more involved and are making decisions, Less wasteful than throwing out defective finished products, Eliminates cost of inspection
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What are the disadvantages of TQM?
Requires strong leadership, Investment in training & support, May become bureaucratic, Disruption and costs may outweigh benefits
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What is Kaizen?
Another kind of quality assurance which is based on concept / culture of continuous improvement. It encourages employees to engage fully with finding ways to improve quality processes
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are some examples of customer needs and expectations?

Back

Performance (fit for purpose) Appearance, Availability & delivery, Reliability / Durable, Price / Value for money

Card 3

Front

How can quality be measured?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Why is quality important?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How does quality relate to competitiveness?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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