Psychology - social

HideShow resource information
Zimbardo's definition of conformity
A result of social influence where people adopt the behaviour, attitudes and values of the majority of members of a reference group
1 of 27
Implicit norms
An unspoken rule of society eg: it is known that you should not stand to close to somebody but this rule is not written down
2 of 27
Explicit norms
Where a form of behaviour is indicated eg: a smoking ban sign
3 of 27
Compliance
Going along with the group publicly, even if we do not really agree with what they are doing
4 of 27
Internalization
The deepest level of conformity; going along with the group because we accept their beliefs and attitudes and they become part of our own way of viewing the world.
5 of 27
Normative Social Influence
Is based on our desire to be liked, approved of and accepted. Publicly going along with the majority but privately maintaining our own views. The type of conformity resulting from normative social influence is compliance.
6 of 27
Informational Social Influence
Is based on our desire to be right. When faced with a new situation we look to others whom we believed to be correct about how to behave, particularly in an ambiguous situation. This can lead to a long lasting change of belief. Internalization.
7 of 27
Sherif (1935)
When faced with an ambiguous situation, ppts look to others for guidance, they experienced informational social influence. Once a group norm was established, ppts used it to make individual judgements later
8 of 27
Asch (1951) results
32% conformed, 74% conformed at least once, 26% never conformed
9 of 27
Hofling
Obedient nurses
10 of 27
Bickman
Power of uniform, - passers by in NYC.
11 of 27
Bushman
Power of uniform - female confederate dressed in either uniform or smart clothes ordering passers-by to gave some money to someone who had no change
12 of 27
Crutchfield
Participants with high scores in intelligence and leadership displayed less conformity.
13 of 27
Milgram (1965) NOT ORIGINAL STUDY
40 male ppts, matched pairs with the ppts of his original study, the ppts worked with two rebellious stooges, at 150 volts one refused to give more shocks, at 210 volts the other refused. In this study, 50% stopped at 150 v and 15% gave 450 v
14 of 27
Internal locus of control
outcomes are within your control and are determined by your hard work and attributes or decisions
15 of 27
External locus of control
outcomes are outside of your control and are determined by 'fate' and are independent of your hard work or decisions
16 of 27
Locus of control as a factor in resisting conformity - Williams and Warchal (1981)
30 university students who were given a range of conformity tasks. Willaims found that those who conformed the most were significatly less assertive but did not score differently of the LOC scale, suggest assertion is more important than LOC.
17 of 27
Locus of control as a factor in resisting conformity - Avtgis (1998)
Meta-analysis of studies into locus of control and conformity. Those who scored higher on external locus of control were more easily persuaded and likely to conform.
18 of 27
Locus of control as a factor in resisting obedience - Latif (2000)
Found a correlation between the belief that blind obedience is morally correct and external locus of control. NOTE: this study only looks at attitudes to obedience, not obedient behaviour
19 of 27
Locus of control as a factor in resisting obedience - Oliner and Oliner (1988)
Interviewed 2 groups of non-jewish people who lived through the holocaust. Compared 406 people who had protected jews from nazis with 126 who had not. 'rescuers' had high measures of social responsibility and ILOC.
20 of 27
Who thought of the locus of control scale?
Rotter
21 of 27
Snyder & Fromkin
Desire for individuation support - one group of american students told that their attitude was different from 10,000 others. 2nd group told that theirs was similar to 10,000 others. Group who were 'similar' resisted conformity to assert individuality
22 of 27
Hamilton
Reactance support - 4636 13-14 yr old australians. 1st con: told smoking is normal but be aware of risks 2nd con: told that they must never smoke. 2nd con smoked more in rebellion
23 of 27
Clark 1998/99
12 angry men study - details in revision notes
24 of 27
Moscovici (1969)
condition where accomplices were consistent showed more ppts giving incorrect answers whereas where ppts were less consistent, ppts gave correct answer more
25 of 27
Mugny (1982)
The importance of self-sacrifice for the cause. Shows people that they are dedicated to what they believe in
26 of 27
Van Avermaet
Snowball effect of minority influence
27 of 27

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

An unspoken rule of society eg: it is known that you should not stand to close to somebody but this rule is not written down

Back

Implicit norms

Card 3

Front

Where a form of behaviour is indicated eg: a smoking ban sign

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Going along with the group publicly, even if we do not really agree with what they are doing

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The deepest level of conformity; going along with the group because we accept their beliefs and attitudes and they become part of our own way of viewing the world.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »