Psychology of Celebrity Stalking

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  • Created by: Esme
  • Created on: 03-03-15 13:22
Who carried out research involving attachment type of 300 college students and celebrity stalking?
McCutcheon (2006)
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What were the results of McCutcheon's research?
Insecure attachment type individuals were more likely to condone behaviours indicative of celebrity stalking because they tend to be needy, socially demanding and clingy therefore more likely to form parasocial relationships which could develop
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What is the definition of cyberstalking?
The repeated use of electronic communications to harass or frighten someone
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Who carried out research involving 4000 female undergraduates and cyberstalking?
Fisher & Cullen (2000)
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What were the results of Fisher & Cullen's research?
13% reported having been cyberstalked
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Why are the high results of Fisher & Cullen's research worrying for celebrities?
High cyberstalking results could be due to the ease of access of personal information on the internet and celebrities' intimate details are available to all on the internet so are at very high risk of being cyberstalked
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Who carried out research involving stalking of the British Royal family?
James (2008)
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What were the results of James' research?
Attempts to attack the British Royal family were from highly disturbed individuals
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What did James' research lead to being developed?
Tony Blair's "Fixated Threat Assessment Centre" to counter threats to VIPS from stalkers
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What were the results of the "Fixated Threat Assessment Centre"?
Out of 275 stalkers of the British Royal family 83.6% had some form of psychotic illness, 18% showed delusions of identity, 12% sought intimacy
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Who carried out research involving behaviours, motivations and psychopathology of 145 stalkers?
Mullen (1999)
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What were the results of Mullen's research?
He identified 5 types of stalkers: Rejected, Intimacy Seeking, Incompetent, Resentful, Predatory
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What types of people did Mullen's sample consist of?
79% men, 39% unemployed, over 50% never had an intimate relationship
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Why is there limited research into celebrity stalking?
Interest in celebrity culture is relatively new and most research into stalking behaviour is into general stalking unspecified to celebrities
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Who carried out research involving perceived seriousness of cyberstalking?
Alexy (2005)
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What were the results of Alexy's research?
29.9% of 756 students considered a vignette of a cyberstalking case to be "stalking" despite the fact the stalker was prosecuted
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Who carried out research involving the effect of types of insecure attachments on motivations for stalking?
Kienlen (1998)
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What were the results of Kienlen's research?
Insecure resistant individuals have little self worth and exhibit anxiety over social rejection so would be motivated to seek the approval, Insecure avoidant individuals maintain emotional distance so would be motivated to retaliate against a wrong
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How is attachment explanation socially sensitive?
Attachment explanation suggests likelihood of stalking increases in individuals who do not have a secure attachment type so people with insecure attachments may be in danger of stigmatization or labelled as potential stalkers
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Card 2

Front

What were the results of McCutcheon's research?

Back

Insecure attachment type individuals were more likely to condone behaviours indicative of celebrity stalking because they tend to be needy, socially demanding and clingy therefore more likely to form parasocial relationships which could develop

Card 3

Front

What is the definition of cyberstalking?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Who carried out research involving 4000 female undergraduates and cyberstalking?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What were the results of Fisher & Cullen's research?

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