PSYA4 - Media Psychology

HideShow resource information
Leyens et al (1975)
Divided juvenile delinquents into two groups - aggressive/non-aggressive boys. Half of each watch violent and half non-violent films. Increase in aggression among those watching violent films.
1 of 23
Josephson (1987)
Found boys who watched a violent programme involving communication via walkie-talkies, were more aggressive than those who watched a non-aggressive film when subsequently receiving instructions via walkie talkie in an ice hockey game.
2 of 23
Drabman and Thomas (1974)
Found children viewing violent films showed less emotional response and more tolerance of subsequent violence.
3 of 23
Sprafkin et al (1975)
Young children who watched an episode of Lassie where a child rescued a dog were more likely to help puppies in distress than this who watched a neutral programme.
4 of 23
Holloway et al (1977)
Participants who 'overheard' pro-social message on radio in waiting room before participating in study involving bargaining were more cooperative in bargaining.
5 of 23
Moeller (1999)
Reported how after media appeals for donations of help of a victim disaster, donations to similar media appeals would decrease.
6 of 23
Matthews et al (2006)
Adolescents randomly assigned to play violent video game had increased amygdala activity (associated with emotions) and decreased prefrontal lobe activity (regulates inhibition, self-control and concentration).
7 of 23
Kestenbaum and Weinstein (1985)
Found computer games had calming effect in helping to manage conflict and discharged aggression by allowing open expression of competition.
8 of 23
Valkenburg and Peter (2009)
Social network sites encourage and permit communication and relationship building.
9 of 23
Daft et al (1987)
Found computer mediated communications negatively affect feedback levels, communication cues, language variety and personal focus - all important in communicating and negotiating.
10 of 23
Hovland and Weiss (1951)
Found more attitude change produced in participants reading an article about building a nuclear submarine supposedly written by an expert, rather than by low credibility source.
11 of 23
Sinclair et al (1991)
Students supported a message about the need for exams if it was given on a sunny rather than cloudy day, regardless of the strength of the message.
12 of 23
Petty and Cacioppo (1986)
Found central processing leads to longer-lasting attitude change than peripheral processing, as it involves more time and cognitive effort.
13 of 23
Berscheid and Walster (1974)
Physically attractive sources, such as sports stars, make messages persuasive, especially if messages concern less involving topics.
14 of 23
Belch (1982)
Studied cognitive effects of advertising repetition for tv commercials in a 1-hour programme. Found attitudes and purchase intentions weren't affected by message repetition and cognitive responses became more negative as exposure frequency increased.
15 of 23
Judd and Alexander (1983)
Found brand names and product information were better recalled by male and female college students from sexually-suggestive advertisements than non-suggestive ones.
16 of 23
DeBacker et al (2007)
Conducted survey of 838 participants and 103 interviews. Found the younger a person, the more they 'learn' from celebrities and the greater the media exposure, the more celebrities are seen as belong to people's social networks.
17 of 23
Dunbar (1997)
Reported two-thirds of conversation is spent on social topics.
18 of 23
Fieldman (2008)
Found females find male celebrities attractive because of qualities advertising toughness, stamina and high levels of testosterone.
19 of 23
McCutcheon et al (2002)
Found negative correlation of -0.4 between amount of education and amount of celebrity worship.
20 of 23
Gabriel (2008)
Have 348 students 11-item questionnaire measuring self-esteem, asked them to write an essay on their favourite celebrity then repeat questionnaire. Those who scored low on self-esteem scored much higher after writing the essay.
21 of 23
Kienlen et al (1997)
Found 63% of stalkers had experienced change or loss of PCG during childhood. Over 50% reported childhood emotional, physical or sexual abuse by PCGs. 80% had also experienced death/loss in 7 months prior to start of stalking behaviour.
22 of 23
Mullen (2008)
Scrutinised 20,000 incidents of stalking the British royal family, finding 80% were by persons with psychotic disorders.
23 of 23

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Found boys who watched a violent programme involving communication via walkie-talkies, were more aggressive than those who watched a non-aggressive film when subsequently receiving instructions via walkie talkie in an ice hockey game.

Back

Josephson (1987)

Card 3

Front

Found children viewing violent films showed less emotional response and more tolerance of subsequent violence.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Young children who watched an episode of Lassie where a child rescued a dog were more likely to help puppies in distress than this who watched a neutral programme.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Participants who 'overheard' pro-social message on radio in waiting room before participating in study involving bargaining were more cooperative in bargaining.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Media psychology resources »