PSYA4

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Greenberg
Equivalent amounts of prosocial ad antisocial content in children's TV
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Bandura
Social Learning Theory, learn to imitate observations from TV, prosocial acts support established social norms, children imitate
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Rosenkoetter
Parental mediation, allows children to understand complex moral messages
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Sprafkin
in Mares examination, young children watched Lassie, imitated altruistic behaviour in TV show
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Friedrich and Stein
Mr Rogers Neighborhood, children had more self control and behaved more positively towards each other
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Johnson and Ettema
prosocial TV, anti gender stereotyping
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Woodard
Low levels of prosocial behaviour in modern TV, also, children did not learn concepts of prosocial behaviour, learned specific behaviours instead
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Mares
Meta analysis, children of different ages are affected by prosocial messages differently, may be a limited effect because of this
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Huesmann and Moise
5 ways that media influences antisocial behaviour; Observational learning and imitation, Cognitive priming (primed to respond aggressively after tv), Desensitisation (children becoming less anxious about violence after tv),
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Huesmann and Moise
[CONT]Lowered physiological arousal, and justification (violent tv relieves guilt and allows justification of their own violent acts)
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Cumberbatch
refutes hypothesis that Jamie Bulger killings were due to violent TV imitation
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Gentile and Stone
children played violent or non violent game, rated higher on 'state hostility scale' after being subjected to white noise (uncomfortable)
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Osswald
more prosocial behaviour from prosocial game than a neutral or an antisocial game
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Lenhart
Large scale study, Halo players + Sims players, committed to civic participation and social commitment.
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Holmes
RWA Tetris, used to reduce traumatic flashbacks of injury, competes with same sensory channels needed to form the memories
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Hovland
Hovland Yale model, focuses on source of message (celebs), content of Message (fear) and the audience
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Putwain and Symes
Fear appeals with threatening approach were less effective than those with 'mastery' approach
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Petty and Cacioppo
Elaboration Likelihood Model: Central route (message based, lasting change) or Peripheral route (no message thought, temporary change) when media persuades us
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Lin
Online shopping, High need for cognition = purchase mobile phones based on quality over quantity
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Fiske and Taylor
people = cognitive misers, seek time efficiency. content of message wont affect us if it isnt relevant to us
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Giles and Maltby/Mccutcheon
3 levels to parasocial relationship: entertainmnt social, intense personal and borderline pathological, IP = PSR
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Sciappa
PSR more likely if celeb is attractive and similar to person
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Cole and Leets
Anxious ambivalent attachment = more likely PSR. avoidant attachment = less likely PSR
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Cheung and Yue
Celeb Worship = low self esteem and identity achievement. worship of family and teachers provided tangible benefits = high self esteem
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Sheridan
worship of antisocial celebs = emulation of rebellious behaviour -ve consequences
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Bartholomew and Horowitz/Meloy
Celeb stalking = Pre-occupied attachment style poor self image and positive image of others, seek personal validation from others
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Tonin
Stalkers detained under mental health act = more chance of insecure attachment
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Social Learning Theory, learn to imitate observations from TV, prosocial acts support established social norms, children imitate

Back

Bandura

Card 3

Front

Parental mediation, allows children to understand complex moral messages

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

in Mares examination, young children watched Lassie, imitated altruistic behaviour in TV show

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Mr Rogers Neighborhood, children had more self control and behaved more positively towards each other

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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