Properties of Metals

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  • Created by: joshd
  • Created on: 01-04-14 19:37
What are most of the elements?
Metals, so they cover most of the periodic table
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Which elements are non-metals?
The elements on the far right.
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Where are the transition metals foind?
In the centre block of the periodic table. Many of the metals in everyday use are transition metals - such as titanium, iron and nickel.
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Name a property of metals (1)
They conduct electricity well. This makes them great for making electrical wires.
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Name a property of metals (2)
They're malleable - this means they can be bent or hammered into different shapes. This makes them handy for making into things like bridges and car bodies.
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What are most metals?
Transition metals.
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What do transition metals have?
High melting points (e.g. iron melts at 1538dC, copper melts at 1085dC)
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What do transition metals form? Give examples and uses.
Very colourful compounds (e.g, potassium chromate (VI) is yellow, potassium manganate (VII) is purple, copper (II) sulfate is blue). Transition metals are responsible for hair dyes, the colours in gemstones and pottery glazes.
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What do all metals have? Why is this? (1)
The same basis properties. These are due to the special type of bonding in metals.
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What do metals consist of? (2)
A regular arrangement of atoms held together with metallic bonds.
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What do the metallic bonds give? Why is this? (3)
A giant structure consisting of positive ions and free electrons. This is because metallic bonds allow the outer electron (s) of each atom to become delocalised (move freely)
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What does this create? Give an example. (4)
A "sea" of delocalised electrons throughout the metal, which is what gives rise to many of the properties of metals. For example, the ability of electrons to move freely through the structure makes metals good conductors of electricity.
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What does this mean? (5)
The giant metallic structure and strong bonds mean that metals have extremely high melting points (and boiling points) and are insoluble.
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What do they also allow? What does this make/mean? (6)
They also allow the layers of atoms to slide over each other, allowing metals to be bent and shaped. This makes metals malleable.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Which elements are non-metals?

Back

The elements on the far right.

Card 3

Front

Where are the transition metals foind?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Name a property of metals (1)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Name a property of metals (2)

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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