Poetry Revision - Conflict

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State three things about the structure of 'Flag.'
The speaker asks about a flag in each stanza - a national symbol of patriotism - and the voice answering explains the powers a flag can have over people. The final stanza is slightly different - the question changes & the answer is the most cynical.
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What does the repetition in 'Flag' remind the reader?
There is no reason for a flag to have this power - we are the ones who gave it the power. The question gives the poet a chance to use a range of verbs about the flag and suggests it can be seen in many places.
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State 2 themes in 'Flag.'
Any two from; -Causes of Conflict -Patriotism -Anti-war message
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What is the poem 'Flag' about?
The power of a national flag. It's presented as a conversation between a naive questioner and a sceptical responder. One characters asks questions about the flag, and the other character explains that the flag has the power to make people fight wars.
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What are three feelings and attitudes presented in 'Flag?'
1. CYNICISM - poet mocking how a flag has such power over others. 2. CONTEMPT - Poet criticizes how people ignore their sense of right/wrong for patriotism. 3. WARNING - poet warns us about letting ourselves be manipulated by empty symbols.
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What are the themes presented in "The Charge of the Light Brigade?" State 2 things.
Any 2 from; -Effects of conflict -Reality of battles -Patriotism
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What is "The Charge of the Light Brigade" about?
The poem describes a disastrous battle between British cavalry and Russian forces during the Crimean War (1853-1856).
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What is the form in "The Charge of the Light Brigade?"
The poem is narrated in the 3rd person, making it seem like a story. A strong, regular, relentless rhythm shown - creates a fast pace, imitating the cavalry going forward and the energy of the battle.
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How is "The Charge of the Light Brigade" structured?
The poem tells the story of the battle in chronological order. Some lines and phrases are repeated throughout the poem, sometimes with subtle differences - keeps the focus on the cavalry troops throughout the poem.
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What is the effect of repetition in "The Charge of the Light Brigade?"
Repetition creates a sense of impending doom, and the idea that what is going to happen is inevitable. Repetition of "the six hundred" in each stanza reinforces the idea of the large numbers of men involved. Also creates an image of a chaotic battle.
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What are the feelings and attitudes presented in "The Charge of the Light Brigade?"
ADMIRATION - poet admires bravery & sacrifice of soldiers who were determined to obey orders. -DISBELIEF - poet shocked by stupidity of order, but respect still shown. 3. HORROR - suggestion that poet is horrified by the violence of the battle.
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What is the poem "Futility" about?
The poem is about an injured, probably dead, soldier. It's set in France during the First World War. The poet questions what the point is of life being created if it can be destroyed so easily.
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Describe the structure presented in "Futility."
Each stanza begins with a command. The first is a practical instruction about how to hep the soldier. In the second stanza the language becomes more philosophical as the poet considers whether creation is worthwhile when life can be ended so quickly.
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Describe the form shown in "Futility."
The poet mainly uses half rhyme (e.g. "seeds" and "sides") rather than full rhyme, which makes the poem seem less formal and more conversational.
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In "Futility," the poet uses a mixture of past and present tenses. What effect does this have?
This shows the contrast between the soldier's life at home and his current situation. The repeated references to walking emphasise the contrast between being awake and alive and being paralysed or dead.
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What is the effect of direct language used in "Futility?"
The poem addresses the reader directly, making the reader feel more emotionally involved with the poem. The poem contains commands and questions that challenge the reader to think about why the soldier's life has been wasted.
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What are the feelings and attitudes presented in "Futility?" State two examples.
-SYMPATHY - Poet is sympathetic to the soldier & uses kind and respectful tone towards him. -ANGER/FRUSTRATION - The poet feels bitter about the waste of life caused by war, and frustrated at the pointlessness of creating life for it to be destroyed.
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Describe the form in "Come On, Come Back."
The line lengths are both short and long, which creates a rambling conversational feeling, and makes the story seem even more unpredictable. There is some random rhyme, half rhyme, and internal rhyme which is sometimes unsettling as it is unexpected.
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Describe the structure of "Come On, Come Back."
The events of the poem are told in chronological order, starting just after Vaudevue fights in the battle at Austerlitz. The last three lines of the poem link back to this battle, creating a circular effect.
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What is the impact of repetition in "Come On, Come Back?"
Repeating the title song reminds the reader of all who have been lost, not just Caudevue. Key words and also repeated to give the poem a cold, deathly feel.
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What is the effect of the different tenses used in "Come On, Come Back?"
There are several references to places associated with past wars. The references to war are both historic and futuristic, suggesting that war and its casualties are universal and timeless.
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What are the feelings and attitudes in the poem "Come On, Come Back?"
IMPERSONAL ATTITUDE - The narrative voice is impersonal - makes reader feel sad about Vaudevue's death even though narrator is detached. IRONY - that Vaudevue and her enemy have the same favorite song. MYSTERY - mysterious elements like moonlight.
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What are the themes in "Come On, Come Back?" State 2 themes.
Any two from; -Death -Sadness -Loss
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What is the poem "Bayonet Charge" about?
A soldier's experience of a violent battle. It describes his thoughts and actions as he desperately tries to avoid being shot. The soldier's overriding emotion and motivation is fear, which has replaced the more patriotic ideas that he had before.
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Describe the form in "Bayonet Charge."
The poet uses a lot of enjambment rather than neat line endings. This creates a haphazard effect which represents the soldier's urgency and desperation as he stumbles forward.
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Describe the structure in "Bayonet Charge."
The poem starts in the middle of the action and covers the soldier's movements/thoughts over time. The middle stanza describes a pause where time briefly stands still and the soldier moves from the reality of his situation becomes more violent.
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What is the effect of universal language in "Bayonet Charge?"
The poet uses the pronoun "he" rather than naming the soldier to keep him anonymous. It suggests that he is a universal figure who could represent any young soldier.
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What is the effect of figurative language in the poem "Bayonet Charge?"
The poet uses powerful figurative language to emphasise the horror and physical pain of the battle.
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State two feelings and attitudes presented in the poem "Bayonet Charge."
TERROR - The poem challenges patriotism and shows how desperate terror becomes the overriding emotion in battle. The soldier is driven forward by fear. CONFUSION - The soldier is confused because he's physically disorientated by the gunfire.
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What are the themes presented in "Bayonet Charge?"
-Effects of conflict -Reality of battles -Nature.
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What is the poem "The Falling Leaves" about?
The poem is about autumn leaves from the trees. The falling leaves remind the poet of young soldiers being killed in war.
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Describe the form in "The Falling Leaves."
Poem is one stanza - only contains one complex sentence - represents a moment of intense thought. The lines are all different lengths - suggests the random way that leaves fall. Regular rhyme scheme creates a peaceful atmosphere with gentle sounds.
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Describe the structure in "The Falling Leaves."
The poem hinges around the semi colon in line 6 - before this the poet is describing the leaves falling, and after she describes soldiers being killed - creates a comparison between leaves falling for no real reason and soldier dying for no cause.
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What is the effect of formal language in "The Falling Leaves?"
The poet uses quite formal, old-fashioned vocabulary to describe a simple scene. This adds dignity and gravity to the comparison with the soldier's deaths.
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What is the effect of natural imagery in "The Falling Leaves?"
Falling leaves and dying men are both compared to snowflakes, highlighting the sheer number of men killed. the silence of their deaths and how quickly their lives vanished. Alliteration is used to describe the natural details like wind and snow.
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Give 3 feelings and attitudes presented in the poem "The Falling Leaves."
SADNESS - calm, reflective tone of sadness as poet imagines numbers of soldiers killed. REGRET - sorrow for the deaths that have happened for no reason. RESPECT - for those who gave their lives in the war.
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Give 3 themes presented in "The Falling Leaves."
-Death -Sadness -Loss.
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What is the poem "next to of course god america i" about?
The poem is a parody of an American, patriotic, pro-war speech. The last line makes it clear that the rest of the poem is spoken by a character, rather than reflecting the poet's own opinions.
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Describe the form presented in "next to of course god america i."
First 13 lines are 1st person dramatic monologue, final line is in the 3rd person, as if the poem is presenting someone giving a speech. 14 regular lines could mimic a sonnet layout.
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Describe the structure in "next to of course god america i."
First 13 lines are in speech marks - words are fragments of full sentences with little punctuation, making the phrases sound confusing/meaningless. The last line is the only one that is standard English - describes the speaker as he finishes talking.
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What is the effect of patriotic language in "next to of course god america i?"
The poem sounds stirring and noble, but only in an ironic way. It's an anti-war poem that makes fun of pro-war patriots. It's full of cliches about heroes, beauty and liberty, lines from patriotic songs and over-the-top American slang.
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What is the effect of rhetorical language in "next to of course god america i?"
The poet uses cliches and exaggerations as the speaker builds up to an emotive end.
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Give two feelings and attitudes presented in the poem "next to of course god america i."
SARCASM - poet mocking the speaker - none of the points are finished/explained, makes the speech seem insincere. CHALLENGING PATRIOTISM - as something to be complacent about and proud of by making the speaker use ridiculous cliches.
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Give two themes in "next to of course god america i."
-Causes of conflict -Patriotism.
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What is the poem "Hawk Roosting" about?
A hawk boasting about its power. The hawk thinks it's the most important creature in the world which controls the universe. The hawk describes how it likes to kill its prey in a particularly violent way.
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Describe the form presented in "Hawk Roosting."
The poem is a dramatic monologue, which helps to make the narrator's argument more direct.
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Describe the structure in "Hawk Roosting."
The monologue ends with a confident statement about the future - the emphasises the hawk's sense of power and control. There is some repetition to give weight to key ideas.
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How is personification used in "Hawk Roosting?"
The earth is personified as a humble subject of the hawk.
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How is self-centred language used in "Hawk Roosting?"
The poet uses a lot of first person pronouns. This underlines how central and important the hawk is in its world.
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How is violent language used in "Hawk Roosting?"
The poem contains strong images of violence and death. This emphasises how efficient the hawk is at killing while remaining unemotional about it.
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State two feelings and attitudes presented in "Hawk Roosting."
POWER - the poet presents the hawk as powerful and destructive. It's proud of its own perfection and efficiency. ARROGANCE - the hawk's attitude is egoistical and arrogant - it's omnipotent in its own eyes.
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What are the three themes presented in "Hawk Roosting?"
-Causes of conflict -Nature -Death
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What is the poem "Out of the Blue" about?
Poem is narrated by a victim of the Twin-Towers terrorist attacks in New York on 9/11. The victim describes being in one of the burning buildings. He addresses someone watching the scene on TV. He pleads for help, but the only outcome is death.1
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Describe the form presented in "Out of the Blue."
There is no regular rhythm but the poem is full of rhyme and internal rhyme. This creates a gentle, sad and helpless tone to the poem. In the first three stanza's, enjambment and questions create a controversial tone.
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Describe the structure presented in "Out of the Blue."
In the final four stanzas the voice sounds more urgent as the danger gets closer and the speaker's hope of being rescued begins to vanish. His tone and actions become more desperate toward the end of the poem.
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How are verbs used in "Out of the Blue?"
Verbs in the present continuous tense (using "-ing") gives us the feeling that the tragedy is happening as we are watching. It makes us feel as helpless as the victim.
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How are questions used in the poem "Out of the Blue?"
The questions make it seem like the narrator is asking for help and is slightly confused that he is not being rescued.
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State 2 feelings and attitudes presented in the poem "Out of the Blue?"
DESPAIR - as the narrator begins to get tired of signalling for help that doesn't come and the fire in the building gets closer. HORROR - the narrator is horrified at the situation and the sight of other victims throwing themselves from the building.
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Give three themes presented in "Out of the Blue."
Individual experiences, helplessness, and death.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What does the repetition in 'Flag' remind the reader?

Back

There is no reason for a flag to have this power - we are the ones who gave it the power. The question gives the poet a chance to use a range of verbs about the flag and suggests it can be seen in many places.

Card 3

Front

State 2 themes in 'Flag.'

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the poem 'Flag' about?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are three feelings and attitudes presented in 'Flag?'

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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