Physics P1 5.6 Sound.

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What is the frequency range of the normal human ear?
From about 20 Hz to about 20 kHz, the ability to hear higher frequencies declines with age.
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What is the oscillation (vibration) of sound waves?
Longitudinal, the direction of the vibrations is the same as the direction in which the wave travels.
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What do sound waves need in order to travel?
A medium.
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What are reflections of sound?
Echos.
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What is sound caused by?
Mechanical vibrations in a substance, and travels as a wave.
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What can sound travel through?
Liquids, solids and gases.
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Through what medium does sound travel the fastest, and through what medium the slowest?
Sound waves generally travel the fastest in solids and the slowest in gases.
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What can't sound waves travel through?
A vacuum (like space), this can be tested by listening to a ringing bell in a 'bell jar', as air is pumped out the sound fades away.
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How do sounds produce echos?
They reflect of hard, flat surfaces such as flat walls and floors however soft things like carpets, curtains and furniture absorb sounds therefore an empty room will sound different once carpets, curtains and furniture are put into it.
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Can sound waves be refracted?
Yes, refraction takes place at the boundaries between layers of air at different temperatures.
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Can sound waves be diffracted?
Yes.
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**LOOK UP DIAGRAM OF A SOUND TEST IN A BELL JAR**
**
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the oscillation (vibration) of sound waves?

Back

Longitudinal, the direction of the vibrations is the same as the direction in which the wave travels.

Card 3

Front

What do sound waves need in order to travel?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are reflections of sound?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is sound caused by?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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