Heating (M-P1)

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Heating
Heating is the transfer of energy, and heat is a measure of energy. Heat is measured in Joules (J), and on an absolute scale (cannot go lower than zero).
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Kinetic Energy
When a substance is heated, the particles of the substance gain Kinetic Energy (KE), which make the particles move faster in a gas or liquid, and vibrate more rapidly in a solid.
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Temperature
Temperature (Celsius and Farenheit) is a measure of the average KE of the particles in a substance. They are not measured on absolute scales due to them being able to go lower than zero.
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Energy
Energy tends to flow from hot objects to cooler ones. IF THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO PLACES, THEN ENERGY WILL FLOW BETWEEN THEM. The greater the difference in temperature, the faster the rate of cooling will be.
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Specific Heat Capacity
Specific Heat Capacity tells you how much energy stuff can store. It takes more heat energy to increase the temperature of some materials than others. You'll need 4,200 J to warm 1 KG of water by 1 C, but only 139 J to warm 1 KG of mercury by 1 C.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

When a substance is heated, the particles of the substance gain Kinetic Energy (KE), which make the particles move faster in a gas or liquid, and vibrate more rapidly in a solid.

Back

Kinetic Energy

Card 3

Front

Temperature (Celsius and Farenheit) is a measure of the average KE of the particles in a substance. They are not measured on absolute scales due to them being able to go lower than zero.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Energy tends to flow from hot objects to cooler ones. IF THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO PLACES, THEN ENERGY WILL FLOW BETWEEN THEM. The greater the difference in temperature, the faster the rate of cooling will be.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Specific Heat Capacity tells you how much energy stuff can store. It takes more heat energy to increase the temperature of some materials than others. You'll need 4,200 J to warm 1 KG of water by 1 C, but only 139 J to warm 1 KG of mercury by 1 C.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5

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