PE Key Words

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AEROBIC
With oxygen. If exercise is not too fast and is steady, the heart can supply all the oxygen the muscles need
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AGILITY
The ability of the performer to change the position of their body quickly whilst keeping their entire body under control e.g. squash, fencing
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ANAEROBIC
Without oxygen. If exercise is done in short, fast bursts, the heart cannot supply blood and oxygen to the muscles as fast as the cells can use them
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ANOREXIC
Lack or loss of appetite for food (as a medical condition)
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BALANCE
The ability of the performer to retain their centre of mass over their base of support e.g. cycling, surfing
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BLOOD SHUNTING
The term shunting of blood refers to when the brain changes the quantity of blood flow heading to certain parts by altering the size of the arteries
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BODY COMPOSITION
The percentage of body weight that is fat, muscle and bone
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CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS
Cardiovascular fitness is the ability to exercise the entire body for long periods of time
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CO-ORDINATION
The ability to move 2 or more body parts accurately and smoothly in response to stimuli from the sense e.g. tennis
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EXERCISE
A form of physical activity to sustain and/or improve health and fitness
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HEALTH
A complete state of physical, mental and social well-being, not just the absence of disease
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FITNESS
The ability to meet the demands of the environment
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PERFORMANCE
How well a task is completed
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FARTLEK TRAINING
A Swedish term meaning “speed play”. Involves a combination of slow and fast running over a variety of terrains
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FITT
A principle that works under progressive overload. As you get fitter, you can train more often/harder/for longer
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FLEXIBILITY
The range of movement possible at a joint
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HEART RATE
AKA pulse - The rate at which the heart beats, usually measured to obtain a quick evaluation of a person's health
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INDIVIDUAL NEEDS
A training programme must take into consideration people's needs e.g. body shape, what activity they take part in and what they want to achieve, to ensure they are working safely and effectively
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MUSCULAR ENDURANCE
The ability to use the same muscles many times without getting tired
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MUSCULAR STRENGTH
The amount of force a muscle can exert against resistance
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OPTIMUM WEIGHT
A person's most healthy weight depending on individual needs, activity, position and role
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OBESE
Grossly fat or very overweight
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OVERFAT
AKA Fat - Having more than is healthy fat
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OVERWEIGHT
Above a weight considered normal or desirable
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OXYGEN DEBT
The amount of oxygen used during recovery above that which would have ordinarily be consumed in the same time at rest
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PAR-Q
This is a test which many consider to measure the minimal fitness for beginning a moderate-intensity exercise program and to identify those few individuals who might have a medical problem or need a doctor's consent to start a fitness routine
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PEP
Personal Exercise Programme - A training plan designed to help a person's fitness, health and performance
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POWER
A combination of strength and speed, the ability to do strength performances quickly. POWER = SPEED X STRENGTH e.g. throwing, sprinting
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PROGRESSIVE OVERLOAD
Gradually increasing the overload so as to gain fitness without the risk of injury
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REACTION TIME
The amount of time it takes for a performer to initiate movement after the presentation of a stimulus e.g. squash, tennis
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RECOVERY
The time required to repair damage caused by physical activity
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REST
The period of time set aside to apply recovery
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REVERSIBILITY
Gradually losing fitness instead of progressing or remaining at the current level
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SMART TARGETS
Targets that are set using SMART in order to be achievable and realistic for the athelete
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SPECIFICITY
Matching the training to the requirements of an acttivity
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SPEED
The rate at which a performer is able to perform a movement or cover a set distance e.g. badminton, running
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TARGET ZONE
The range of speed at which one's heart should beat during exercise
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TRAINING
The action of teaching or maintaining a person or animal a particular skill or type of behaviour
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The ability of the performer to change the position of their body quickly whilst keeping their entire body under control e.g. squash, fencing

Back

AGILITY

Card 3

Front

Without oxygen. If exercise is done in short, fast bursts, the heart cannot supply blood and oxygen to the muscles as fast as the cells can use them

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Lack or loss of appetite for food (as a medical condition)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The ability of the performer to retain their centre of mass over their base of support e.g. cycling, surfing

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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