PE - History

characteristics of popular recreation
natural // local // simple or unwritten rules // cruel or violent // occasional // courtly or popular // rural // occupational // wagering
1 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of bathing and swimming in popular recreation
likely to increase skill and health
2 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of athletics in popular recreation
pedestrianism required skill and would need and increase physical fitness and thus health
3 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of football in popular recreation
involvement is unlikely and so there is no impact
4 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of cricket in popular recreation
outside and active during summer months so a skillful game with potential to improve health
5 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of real tennis in popular recreation
a skillfull potentially health enhancing game for the elite
6 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of bathing and swimming in popular recreation
key functional role for hygiene and likely to increase skill and health
7 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of athletics in popular recreation
pedestrianism required skill and would need/increase physical fitness
8 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of football in popular recreation
mob football was forceful rather than skillful. could be harmful with severe injuries and fatalities
9 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of cricket in popular recreation
outside and active during summer months so a skillful game with potential to improve health
10 of 100
activities for the upper class in pre-industrial britain were ....
sophisticated / expensive / rule based/ dress code and etiquette / distant due to travel opportunities
11 of 100
activities for the lowerclass in pre-industrial britain were ....
simple / accessible and inexpensive / simple and unwritten rules / violent and uncivilised / linked with occupation / local
12 of 100
characteristics of rational recreation
purpose-built facilities / fair play/ amateurism or professionalism / control of gambling / urban or suburban / exclusive or elitist / regular / respectable / codified and administrated / regional , national and international
13 of 100
social features of pre-industrial britain
seasonal time / limited transport and communication / illiteracy / harsh rural lifestyle / 2 class society / uncivilised due to lack of policing system / lack of tchnology
14 of 100
social features of post industrial britain
machine time / improved transport and communication / business and administration skills / civilised lifestyle / emergence of the middle class / industrial / increased law and order / technological advancements
15 of 100
view of the church in the nedieval period and puritanism
church opposed many popular sports / the puritans were against the spontaneity and freedom of traditional sports and pasttimes / believed that only the prayerfull, sober andquiet people would be saved
16 of 100
view of the church from the 1700 to 1850 and protestanism
in the 1700s churches provided feast days and community gatherings / in 1800s they criticised drunke excess and violence of popular recreation / resulted in decline in participation
17 of 100
view of the church in the 1850s evanngelism and social christianity
by mid 19th cent newly ordinated ex school boys started to promote sport in their parishes / the YMCA encouraged participation in rational sport
18 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of bathing and swimming in rational recreation
increased skill and health for middle class as they took to and developed rational swimming in urban baths
19 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of athletics in rational recreation
opportunitites to increase skill and health as governing bodies were formed
20 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of football in rational recreation
amateur involvement often in exclusive teams
21 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of cricket in rational recreation
skillful with potential to increase health as a summer outdoor active game
22 of 100
effects on skill and health for the upper class of lawn tennis in rational recreation
skillful and potentially health enhancing for middle class with new opportunities for women
23 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of bathing and swimming in rational recreation
initially functional to combat urban disease - penny baths
24 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of athletics in rational recreation
opportunitites to increase skill and health as governing bodies were formed
25 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of football in rational recreation
mainly as spectators so no physical health or skill development / opportunities for a few very skillful players to become proffessional
26 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of cricketin rational recreation
skillful with potential to increase health as a summer outdoor active game
27 of 100
effects on skill and health for the lower class of lawn tennis on rational recreation
limited access for lower class until club and park provision developed
28 of 100
characteristic of 19th cent public schools
boarding / expanding / non-local / spartan / controlled by trustees / endowed / fee-paying / gentry / boys
29 of 100
what was the chlarendon report and what did it find
examined all aspects of the 9 leading public schools after complaints / published in 1864 / the status of games in all schools was extremily high
30 of 100
nature of the games in stage 1 of 19th cent public schools
institutionalised popular recreation a reflection of society activites were childlike and barbaric
31 of 100
status of the games in stage 1 of 19th cent public schools
no official rank, position or status for sports and games / informal games were important to boys but ignored by teachers
32 of 100
organisation of games in stage 1 of 19th cent public schools
activites were organised by and for the boys themselves with no master involvement outside the classroom / unplanned informal and limited levels of organisation
33 of 100
technical development in stage 1 of 19th cent public schools
simple / naturally occurring facilities / local rules / simple equipment
34 of 100
social relationships in stage 1 of 19 cent public schools
widespread bullying and brutality with distrust and poor relationships
35 of 100
values in stage 1 of 19th cent public schools
every man for himself / survival of the fittest
36 of 100
nature of the games in stage 2 of 19th cent public schools
games reformed along with schools where they existed / transition from popular recreation to rational recreation
37 of 100
status of the games in stage 2 of 19th cent public schools
both schools and the games grew in status
38 of 100
organisation of games in stage 2 of 19th cent public schools
schools and games became more organised especially with the growth of the house system
39 of 100
technical development in stage 2 of 19th cent public schools
more regular play on inter-house basis / games became more structured with specialist kit , equipment and facilities
40 of 100
social relationships in stage 2 of 19 cent public schools
improving relationships and restrictions on bullying and brutality
41 of 100
values in stage 2 of 19th cent public schools
games used to achieve social control
42 of 100
nature of the games in stage 3 of 19th cent public schools
games rationalized and respectable
43 of 100
status of the games in stage 3 of 19th cent public schools
played obsessively at cult proportion by many boys and master / often compulsory each day
44 of 100
organisation of games in stage 3 of 19th cent public schools
highly organised and fully codified when NGBs were being established
45 of 100
technical development in stage 3 of 19th cent public schools
fully technically developed with kit and specialist facilities / skill rather than force / specialist coaches in some sports
46 of 100
social relationships in stage 3 of 19 cent public schools
more friendly between boys and masters and less bullying
47 of 100
values in stage 3 of 19th cent public schools
games played for the development of character (loyalty , honest , teamwork)
48 of 100
ex public schoolboys became ...
teachers / parents / politicians / community members / army officers / vicars
49 of 100
what was stage 1 bathing and swimming
informal bathing in natural facilities during summer months (mainly for recreation)
50 of 100
what was stage 2 bathing and swimming
more regular and regulated bathing for hygiene, safety and recreation / increasingly thought to be beneficial for a healthy lifestyle
51 of 100
what was stage 3 bathing and swimming
increased technical development with changing huts , diving boards / purpose built facilities and competitions / swimming masters for teaching and safety
52 of 100
what was stage 1 athletics
informal running and exploring the countryside lead to tresspassing
53 of 100
what was stage 2 athletics
trespass restricted or banned but hare ad hound and steeple chase continued on a formal basis
54 of 100
what was stage 3 athletics
steeple chase and cross country running / annual sports days as major sporting and social occasions
55 of 100
what was stage 1 football
mob games and the first melting pot of activites from home towns
56 of 100
what was stage 2 football
more formalised football rules for individual schools / inter house competition
57 of 100
what was stage 3 football
formal football association (FA) rules
58 of 100
what was stage 1 cricket
transfered directly into schools due to its non violent nature, rules and upper class nature
59 of 100
what was stage 2 cricket
cricket encouraged with massive inter-house participation
60 of 100
what was stage 3 cricket
continued technical development such a proffessional coaching
61 of 100
what was stage 1 tennis
informal hand and ball games against availible walls and buildings referred to as fives
62 of 100
what was stage 2 tennis
some fives courts built though fives still and informal activity / game of racquets developing as more formal alternative
63 of 100
what was stage 3 tennis
fives continued as recreational game / racquets a more formal game of higher status / lawn tennis low status in boys schools but higher status in girls schools
64 of 100
bathing and swimming as popular recreation
bathing for pleasure in summer / rivers provided food , a place to wash and travel / learning to swim was necessary / ability to swim was part of the chivalric code /
65 of 100
bathing and swimming as rational recreation
public baths helped stop spread of disease / rivers became polluted so couldnt be used / only upper class could afford bathrooms / wash house act 1864 let local authorities apply for grant to build washing facilities / first & second class facilities
66 of 100
swimming today
pool technology (hoists) / mother and baby classes / health clubs and spas / success of 2012 olympics inspired / embarassment on body image / religion and culture restict particiaption
67 of 100
athletics as popular recreation
drinking and play closely associated / organisation was0 basic / unwritten rules passed on by mouth / opportunity for men to test strength and virgility / peasant women would also race / prizes were practical e.g. cloths or food /
68 of 100
athletics as rational recreation
urbanisation led to end of rural fairs lower classes used running as a source of income / exploitation was widespread / first purpose built track was in the late 1830s /
69 of 100
athletics today
jogging and running is cheap / technology developments / sports hall athletics in winter / lottery funding means it can be a career / negative image due to drug scandals / some field events are not cool
70 of 100
football as popular recreation
often tragic / rowdy and violent and locally coded / played in village streets / damaged villages / high levels of wagering on outcome / lower class only
71 of 100
values associated with football in 19th cent public schools
teamwork / loyalty / courage/ commitment / discipline / henesty/ trust
72 of 100
football as rational recreation
simple and affordable / improved transport and communication meant could travel / made heroes among the working class
73 of 100
football today
national game / high participation and spectators / boom sport for women / played in schools / technology development / elite performers earn a lot / football camps and academies / reputation of poor behaviour
74 of 100
cricket as popular recreation
social classes played together but got ready in different changing rooms / employed estate workers as gardeners / widespread wagering
75 of 100
cricket as rational recreation
william clarke XI took cricket from localised to sport to national success / made touring proffessional sides that toured england and got a lot of crowds
76 of 100
cricket today
8000 cricket clubs in england / summer game in state schools / adapted games for disabilities / technology development / twenty20 game
77 of 100
tennis as popular recreation
real or royal tennis originated in france / exclusive elitist game for upper class / complex rules and high level of skills /
78 of 100
what is fives
ancient and informal in origin / popular in public schools / played in free time
79 of 100
what is racquets
first played informally but in 1850 2 standardised courts were built at harrow / had high social status / the game became more sophisticated
80 of 100
tennis as rational recreation
lawn tennis invented by middle class walter clopton / he sold the game in a box with poles, pegs, a net, 4 bats etc/ played on an hourglass shaped court / bought by upper class and middle class families
81 of 100
tennis as a vehicle for the emancipation of women
helped dispell negative stereotypes / part of family recreation / women could particpate in a mildly stenuous game / werent expected to exel / could be played by both sexes together /
82 of 100
tennis today
technology / still a middle class game / incresing indoor courts / media coverage / summer game / difficult / computer alternatives eg wii
83 of 100
why was the model course of 1902 quickly replaced
military drills were soon deemed unsuitable for children / did not cater for different ages / boring dull and repetative / no individuality or group work
84 of 100
why was the 1933 sylabus replaced in the 1950s
more holistic or child centred approach thought necessary / more variety needed e.g. gymnastics and dance / better provision of equipment /
85 of 100
objectives of the model course 1902
fitness for military and war / training in handling weapons / discipline for the working class
86 of 100
content of the model course 1902
military drills and marching / static exercises / weapon training / deep breathing
87 of 100
methodology of the model course 1902
command - response / whole group response / no individuality / in ranks
88 of 100
background of the model course 1902
backward step in educaiton / military needs / girls ad boys instructed together / dull and repetative
89 of 100
objective of the syllabus of physical training 1933
physical fitness / therapeutic benefits/ good physique / good posture / development of mid and body
90 of 100
content of the syllabus of physical training 1933
athletics/ gymnastics / games skills / group wor
91 of 100
methodology of the syllabus of physical training 1933
still direct and centralised / group work / encouragement of kit / five 2o minute lessons a week / outdoor lessons recomended / some specialiset pe teachers
92 of 100
backgrounf of the syllabus of physical training 1933
industrial depression left many unemployed/ seperated ages - under elevens and over elevens
93 of 100
objectives of moving and growing and planning the programme in 1952 and 1954
physical social and cognitive development / variety of experiences / enjoyment / personal satisfaction / increased involvement
94 of 100
content of moving and growing and planning the programme in 1952 and 1954
agility exercises / dance / theme work / movement to music / apparatus work
95 of 100
methodology of moving and growing and planning the programme in 1952 and 1954
child centred / progressive / more specialised pe teachers / teacher guidance rather than direciton / problem solving / individual interpretation
96 of 100
background of moving and growing and planning the programme in 1952 and 1954
bulter education act of 1944 ensured equality of edcation / school leaving age raised to 15
97 of 100
impact of industrial action by teacher in state schools in the 70s and 80s
reduced opportunity and provision / extra-curriclura activities reduced / participation shifted to clubs / negative press of teachers
98 of 100
positive impacts of the national curriculum
higher standards / broad and balanced pe experience / easy trnsfer between schools / provides support for teachers especially non specialist / increased likelyhood of life long participation
99 of 100
negative impacts of the national curriculum
large amounts of paperwork / reduce creativity of teacher as they fel condtrained / pressure on schools with facilites / schools dtill offer and unbalanced programme / demanding on teachers who lack support
100 of 100

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

effects on skill and health for the upper class of bathing and swimming in popular recreation

Back

likely to increase skill and health

Card 3

Front

effects on skill and health for the upper class of athletics in popular recreation

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

effects on skill and health for the upper class of football in popular recreation

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

effects on skill and health for the upper class of cricket in popular recreation

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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