Parts of Brain and Functions

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Brain Stem
Oldest part of the brain; where the spinal cord enters the skull and connects to the brain
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Medulla
Controls actions that require no conscious effort (e.g. beating of heart and movement of the lungs during breathing)
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Pons
Coordinates other automatic functions; movement, non-sexual arousal, autonomic functions, sleep and relaying instructions between the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex
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Thalamus
Two egg-shaped structures that take in sensory information related to seeing, hearing, touching, tasting and smelling (5 senses)
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Reticular Formation
Finger-shaped nerve network inside the brain stem that is essential for non-sexual arousal (sleeping, walking, pain perception, etc)
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Cerebellum (Little Brain)
Baseball sized region at the bottom of the brain stem; responsible for non-verbal learning, memory, time perception, modulating emotions, voluntary movement; impaired easily under the influence of alcohol
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Hypothalamus (Limbic System)
Regulates body temperature, circadian rhythms, hunger and helps to control and regulate the endocrine system; governs the pituitary gland
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Amygdala (Limbic System)
Two bean-sized clusters of neurones; involved in memory consolidation and emotion
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Hippocampus (Limbic System)
Symmetrical and found in both hemispheres of the brain; central to formation of new memories and also involved in emotion and learning; function deteriorates with age as nerve connections are damaged and eventually lost
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Cerebral Cortex
Thin layer of over 2 billion interconnected neurones covering the left and right hemispheres of the brain
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Frontal Lobes
Located just behind your forehead; involved in speaking, planning, judging, abstract thinking, reasoning, motor skills, higher level cognition, expressive language and aspects of your personality
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Damage to Frontal Lobes
Can lead to changes in sexual habits, socialisation and attention; can also cause increased risk-taking
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Parietal Lobes
Located in the middle section of the brain; receive and process senses of touch, pressure, pain and body position
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Damage to Parietal Lobes
Can lead to problems with verbal memory, an impaired ability to control eye gaze and problems with language
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Occipital Lobes
Located at the back of the brain; contains primary visual cortex which receives information related to sight from the retina, interpret visual stimuli
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Damage to Occipital Lobes
Can cause visual problems like the inability to recognise objects, identify colours or recognise words
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Parietal Lobes
Located just above your ears; contains primary auditory complex which interprets sound and language - hippocampus located in temporal lobes so also processes memories and controls formation of new memories
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Damage to Parietal Lobes
Can lead to problems with memory, speech perception and language skills
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Controls actions that require no conscious effort (e.g. beating of heart and movement of the lungs during breathing)

Back

Medulla

Card 3

Front

Coordinates other automatic functions; movement, non-sexual arousal, autonomic functions, sleep and relaying instructions between the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Two egg-shaped structures that take in sensory information related to seeing, hearing, touching, tasting and smelling (5 senses)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Finger-shaped nerve network inside the brain stem that is essential for non-sexual arousal (sleeping, walking, pain perception, etc)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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