Parliament: Key Words & Terms

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Life Peerages Act 1958
This permitted men and women to be created as peers fpr the duration of their lives. The purpose was to diversify membership of the chamber.
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Parliament Act 1911
Removed the power of permanent veto over legislation, so that the Lords could not indefinitely delay legislation.
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The Parliament Act 1949
This further limited the delaying of power by the Lords. Any bill that passed in two successive sessions became law.
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Hereditary Peerages
Peerages that came as a result of a title inherited within the family
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Public Bills
Bills which change the law as it applies to the whole community, being binding on everyone. They are the most common bill introduced in parliament
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Private Members' Bills
Bills which are introduced by peers in the Lords. They go through the same stages as any other public bill.
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Green Paper
A document laid before the House of Commons by ministers, setting out the options that might be pursued in a given policiy area; a consultive paper that invites opinions
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White Paper
A document issued by ministers that sets out their proposals on a topic of current concern, prior to the production of a bill
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Standing Committees
Committees of the House of Commons that scrutinise and amend the details of bills, clause by clause. They comprise back-bench MPs of all parties, the number for each party depending on its relative strength in the chamber.
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Departmentmental Select Committees
The 19 parliamentary scrutiny committees responsible for examining the expenditure, administration and policy of their relevant department, e.g. Defence.
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Public Accounts Committee
The committee that examines the accounts, showing how money granted by parliament has been used in programmes involving public expenditure.
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Westland Affair 1986
A highly contentious political issue that had to be handled by the Thatcher government, concerning the future ownership of the Westland helicopter company
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Front-benchers and Back-benchers
In the house of commons: Seating is arranged in blocks or rows with each political party grouped together. The government benches are to the right of the Speaker, the opposition to the left
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Career Politicians
People committed to politics which they regard as their vocation. They know little else beyond the world of politics.
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Political Staffers
are those who have served a political apprenticeship working as assistants for MPs or at a party's headquarters
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International Monetary Fund
An international organisation of 185 member countries, established to promote international monetary corporation, encourage economic growth, and provide temporary financial assistance.
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Delegated Legislation
Relates to laws made by ministers, under powers granted to them by parliament, e.g. to ministers.
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Statutory Instruments
Many acts are passed in outline form, allowing ministers to introduce the necessary orders or regulations e.g. increasing levels of benefit payment.
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Early Day Motions
MPs may table motions for debate 'on an early day' which in most cases never comes, the purpose being to draw attention to an issue.
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Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition
The second largest party in the house of commons and a recognised part of the constitution
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Mavericks
Individualists, in this case MPs willing to act according to their own priorities rather than those of their own party
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Managed Economy
A situation in which there is a high degree of government intervention in the economy.
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1922 Committee
This is made up of all Conservative back bench MPs, although front-benchers, except the leader, can attend when the party is in opposition
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The Commons Liaison Committee
Includes the 30 chairmen of select committees. It is appointed to consider general matters relating to the work of select committees and to report on them to the house
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Card 2

Front

Removed the power of permanent veto over legislation, so that the Lords could not indefinitely delay legislation.

Back

Parliament Act 1911

Card 3

Front

This further limited the delaying of power by the Lords. Any bill that passed in two successive sessions became law.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Peerages that came as a result of a title inherited within the family

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Bills which change the law as it applies to the whole community, being binding on everyone. They are the most common bill introduced in parliament

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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