P4h: Fission and Fusion

This item deals with work on the processes of nuclear fission and fusion. Nuclear fission is a major source of energy and can be used to produce electricity. Oil and gas will become less important as supplies decrease and alternative forms of energy will be needed. This item explains the process of nuclear fission and how the energy produced can be harnessed to produce electricity. The prospect of harnessing nuclear fusion for power generation is also considered. 

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What do nuclear power stations use as fuel?
Uranium
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Three main stages in the production of electricity.
1. Source of energy 2. Used to produce steam 3. Used to produce electricity.
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What does nuclear fission produce?
Nuclear waste.
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The process that gives out energy in a nuclear reactor is called...
Nuclear Fission, it is kept under control.
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What is the difference between nuclear fission and nuclear fusion?
Fission is the splitting of nuclei, fusion is the joining of nuclei.
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What have a group of scientists claimed to have successfully achieve?
'Cold Fusion'
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Why is it unlikely that scientists successfully managed to carry out cold fusion?
Other scientists have not been able to repeat their findings.
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How is domestic electricity generated at a nuclear power station?
Nuclear reaction - producing heat - heats water to produce steam - steam turns a turbine - turbine drives a generator.
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What happens to allow uranium to release energy?
Uranium nucleus is hit by a neutron, this causes the nucleus to split, energy is released, mrs neutrons released.
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How does the decay or uranium start a chain reaction?
The fission of uranium can set up a chain reaction that will keep on releasing energy as long as there are uranium nuclei present. If this chain reaction is allowed to get out of control,energy is released quickly and the result is a nuclear bomb.
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What is meant by chain reaction?
When each uranium nucleus splits more than one neutron is given out, these neutrons can cause further uranium nuclei to split,
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How do scientists stop nuclear reactions going out of control?
Rods placed in the reactor to absorb some of the neutrons, allowing enough neutrons to remain to keep the process operating.
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How does nuclear fusion release energy?
Fusion happens when two nuclei join together, fusion produces large amounts of heat energy, fusion happens at extremely high temperatures.
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Why is fusion for power generation difficult?
It requires extremely high temperatures and these have to be safely managed.
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Why is fusion power research carried out as a international joint venture?
The ocean could provide almost limitless amounts of the hydrogen isotopes needed for nuclear fusion,so scientists believe that it is worth trying to design&build a fusion power station. This is so expensive that several countries are working together
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Equation that shows how different isotopes of hydrogen can undergo fusion to form helium.
1/1 H + 2/1 H ----> 3/2 He
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What are the conditions needed for fusion to take place in stars?
happens naturally under extremely high temperatures and pressures
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What are the conditions needed for fusion to take place in fusion bombs?
Starts off with a fission bomb, extremely high temperatures and/or pressures
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What are the conditions needed for fusion to take place in power generation?
Extremely high temperatures and/or pressures are required, this combination offers safety and practical challenges.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Three main stages in the production of electricity.

Back

1. Source of energy 2. Used to produce steam 3. Used to produce electricity.

Card 3

Front

What does nuclear fission produce?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

The process that gives out energy in a nuclear reactor is called...

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the difference between nuclear fission and nuclear fusion?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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