P2 Unit 1: Static and Current

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  • Created by: nicola
  • Created on: 25-05-15 09:25
What is the structure of an Atom?
The nucleus of an atom consits of protons and neutrons. Ectrons orbit the nuclues in shells or rings. Protons have a mass of 1 and a charge of +1. Neutrons have a mass of 1 and a charge of 0. Electrons have a mass of 0 and a charge of -1.
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What are insulators? How do you charge an insulator? 1/2
When two insulators are rubbed together the friction causes electrons to transfer from one insulators to the other (as protons can't be transfer).
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What are inulators? How do you charge an insulator? 2/2
The insulator that gains electrons becomes negatively charged (as it now has more electrons than protons). The insulator that loses electrons becomes positively charged (as it now has more protons than electrons )
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What are the likely charges and the unlikely charges?
Similar charges repel (want to spread out) oppsite charges attract (want to movie in together).
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How does an electric shock happen? Example: Touching a door knob. 1/2
Friction between two insulators (shoes worn by the person and the carpet/clothles) cause electrons to be transferred and a charge to build up on the objects.
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How does an electric shock happen? Example: Touching a door knob. 2/2
When a charged object (person) comes near another object (door knob) electrons jump through the air to cancel out the charge (away from negatively charged objects). The spark (sudden movement of electrons) is the electric shock we feel.
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What causes lightning? 1/2
Clouds rub together and transfer electrons. Clouds that gain electrons become negatively charged. Clouds that loose electrons become positively charge.
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What cause lightning? 2/2
If the charge becomes big enough the electrons will jump, in the form of lightning, away from negatively charged clouds to the ground, from the ground to positively charged clouds or from negatively charged to a positively charged cloud.
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How does induction work? 1/3
When you bring a charged object near another object the charged object it either attracts or repels the electrons in the other object depending if it is positively or negatively charged.
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How does induction work? 2/3
. Negative object will repel the electrons away from the surface leaving the protons on the surface giving the surface a positive charge.
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How does induction work? 3/3
Positively charged object will attract the electrons towards the surface giving the surface a negatively charge. As the object and the surface now have opposite charges they will attract.
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What is Earthing?
Connecting an object to the ground with a conductor (metal wire), which allows electrons to travel to orfrom the object easily without jumping through the air (so no sparks and no build-up of charge.
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How does Electrostatic spray paint work? 1/2
By making the paint positively charged when it is released from the spray gun it will all have the same charge and will spread out because similar charges repel (helps to give and even coat).
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How does Electrostaic spray paint work? 2/2
If the object being painted is given an opposite charge (negative) the paint will be attracted to it because opposite attract (this means less paint is wasted and takes less time as any paint that misses is attracted back and coats the other side).
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What are the dangers of electrostatics? 1/2
When refuelling a vehicle the fuel can become charged as it rubs against the inner surface of the hose. Electrons are transferred from the hose to the fuel making the fuel negatively charged the vehicle then becomes negatively charged as it fills wi
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What are the dangers of electrostatics? 2/2
If the charge becomes big enough electrons will jump from the vehicle back to the hose or to the ground in form of a spark which then could ignite any fuel vapour which may cause an explosion.
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Hopw can you prevent the dangers of electrostatic?
To prevent this we connect the vehicle to the ground and fuel tanker with conductor (metal wire) so electrons can flow to cancel out the charge without jumping through the air (so no spark or build – up of charge).
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What is a current ?
Current is the rate of flow of charge. Measured in (A) Amps. Current in a metal is the flow of electrons.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are insulators? How do you charge an insulator? 1/2

Back

When two insulators are rubbed together the friction causes electrons to transfer from one insulators to the other (as protons can't be transfer).

Card 3

Front

What are inulators? How do you charge an insulator? 2/2

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the likely charges and the unlikely charges?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How does an electric shock happen? Example: Touching a door knob. 1/2

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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