Overextension

HideShow resource information
Dog
Any animal with 4 legs and a tail e.g. Cat, Leopard
1 of 36
Overextension
Feature of CL where the word used to label something is stretched to include things that aren't normally part of words meaning.
2 of 36
Dog
a child might not think that other dogs are dogs
3 of 36
Underextension
Feature of CL where the word used to label is ‘reduced’ to include any part its normal message.
4 of 36
Overextension is more
common than underextension. One third are likely to be overextended (post telegraphic)
5 of 36
Theorist: Eve Clark
Study of first words found that children base overextensions on: Physical Qualities - taste, sound, movement, shape, size and texture. Children’s first words reveal their experiences of the world at this point dominated by senses.
6 of 36
Common adjectives
‘nice’ ‘big’ are among child’s first 50 words
7 of 36
Spatial adjectives
‘wide’, ‘narrow’, ‘thick’, ‘thin’ required later.
8 of 36
Categorical Overextension
The name for one member of a category is given to all members of the category. Apple used for all round fruit. (60% of overextension)
9 of 36
Analogical Overextension
The name for one member of a category is given to all members of the category. Apple used for all round fruit. (60% of overextension)
10 of 36
Analogical Overextension
A word for one object is extended to another category of some physical or functional connection. Ball used for a round fruit, (15% of overextension)
11 of 36
Mismatch Statements
One word sentences appear abstract. Child makes statement about object in relation to another. Saying duck when looking at empty pond (25% of overextension)
12 of 36
Getting It Right
....
13 of 36
By the age of 2½
marked decrease in number of overextensions
14 of 36
Explanations
– children’s vocab in increasingly rapidly - filling the gaps previously filled by overextension words.
15 of 36
How to children develop semantic understanding beyond overextension?
....
16 of 36
Theorist: Jean Aitchison
Believed that there were three development stages that showed how children make connection between their lexical and sematic development.
17 of 36
1. Labelling
linking words to the objects to which they refer understanding that things can be labelled. E.g. Mummy refers to the child’s mother
18 of 36
2. Packaging
exploring using labels and to what extent they can be applied. Over/underextension is common but it is vital understanding. E.g. moon. Moon moon. More moon. Adult realises child means stars.
19 of 36
3. Network Building
making connection between words understanding and opposites is meaning. E.g. understanding the relationship between hypernyms and hyponyms.
20 of 36
Hyponyms and Hyphernyms
...
21 of 36
Once children have expanded their vocab
they can use network building to sort out the ways
22 of 36
Hyponymy is a development stage.
It is the Hyponymy that is hierarchical structure that exists between lexical items.
23 of 36
Hyphernyms
is a subordinate more general - words beneath its lexical hierarchy e.g. clothes
24 of 36
Hyponym
is more specific words within a category that are more specific.
25 of 36
Theorist: Fantastic Piaget
Emphasised children are active learners who use their environment and social interactions to shape their language. Linked linguistic development with concepts surroundings the words meanings. Believed children cannot be taught before they are ready.
26 of 36
Piagets Four Stages
1. Sensormimotor 2. Pre – operational 3. Concrete 4. Apparitional Formal operation
27 of 36
Sensorimotor…..up to 2
Child experiences world through senses. Begins to classify things in it. Lexical choices = concrete rather abstract. Concept = an object stills exists out of sight e.g. Teddy left on the bed, still is there even if they can’t see it from another room
28 of 36
Pre – operational….2-7
Language and motor skills (physical movement) develop is egocentrism. Focused on the child or used by the child with no one around.
29 of 36
Concrete Apparitional…7-11
Children begin to think logically about concrete objects.
30 of 36
Formal operation….11+
Abstract reasoning development
31 of 36
Give an example of a Virtuous Error
Runned Fast (adds ed) doesn't know the word run = regular verb
32 of 36
Yes he did run fast is an example of
Positive Reinforcement – doesn't correct him by saying “no it’s run”
33 of 36
Mummy’s bus take us is an example of
Categorical/overextension error (bus)
34 of 36
Mistaking a paracel fro a present is an example of
Analogical overextension (parcel similar look)
35 of 36
No not daddy it’s the postman is an example of
Negative Reinforcement
36 of 36

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Overextension

Back

Feature of CL where the word used to label something is stretched to include things that aren't normally part of words meaning.

Card 3

Front

Dog

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Underextension

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Overextension is more

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language resources:

See all English Language resources »See all Child language acquisition resources »