Of Mice and Men revision cards

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  • Created by: Emead98
  • Created on: 17-05-14 14:16
A fact for context
John Steinbeck was born in 1902 in Salinas, California, a region that became a big part in the setting in Of Mice and Men
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A fact for context
As a teenager, Steinbeck spent his summers working on neigbouring ranches.
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A fact for context
Of Mice and Men was set in the time of the Great Depression, 1930's
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What was one of the ideas/theme for the book?
The economic conditions of the time victimised workers like George and Lennie, whose quest for land was thwarted by cruel and powerful forces beyond their control, but whose tragedy was marked by compassion and love.
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A fact for context
The book illustrates how gruelling, challenging and often unrewarding the life of migrant farmers could be.
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Describe Lennie's character
A large, lumbering, child-like migrant worker. Due to mental disability he depend on George. Holds on to the dream of owning own farm. Gentle and kind, doesn't understand own strength. Has love of petting soft things which leads to disaster.
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Why must the readers know from the start of the novella that Lennie is doomed?
The tragedy depends upon the outcome being inevitable. The readers have to feel a great deal of sympathy towards lennie.
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Why do readers feel sympathetic towards Lennie?
Because of his utter helplessness in the face of the events that unfold. Lennie is completely defenseless. His innocence.His enthusiasm. Character that Steinbeck set up for disaster.
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Describe George's character
He is short-tempered but loving and devoted friend. May be terse and impatient at times but he never strays from his primary purpose of protecting Lennie.
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What do readers learn about George?
That he is capable of change and growth. He admits to once abusing lennie for entertainment, but learnt it was wrong. As the story goes on it seems him come to the realisation that the world is designed to prey on the weak.
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How does George's character start off at the beginning of the novella?
He is an idealist. Despite his hardened, gruff exterior he believes in the story of their future. Longs for freedom, wants to live in safety and comfort with Lennie, away from people like Curley.
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What was George's character like at the end of the novella?
He knows that life isn't fair and that he has to let go of his dream and Lennie.
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Why does George kill Lennie?
Because he knows that it is kinder. He spares him a merciless death, but at the same time he puts to rest his own dream.
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On which character does one of the book's major themes and several of its dominant symbols revolve around?
Candy
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Who is Candy?
Old handymen, only one hand. Worries that boss will declare him useless and demand that he leave the ranch.
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Why is Candy's fear of being fired enforced?
His dog was shot because it was too old. Candy's dog serves as a harsh reminder of the fate that awaits anyone who outlives his usefulness.
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What distracts Candy from his worries?
The dream of living with George and Lennie on their dream farm. He deems it worth his life savings, which testifies to his desperate need to believe in a world kinder than the one he lives in. Clings to the idea of freedom.
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How does Steinbeck present women throughout the book?
Of mice and men is not kind in its portrayal of women. Steinbeck depicts women as troublemakers who bring ruin on men and drive them mad. Curley's wife is a prime example of this destructive tendency
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How does the character of Curley's wife start of?
First impression: Tramp, tart, trouble, foreshadowing of Lennie's death. Relatively complex character.
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At what point could readers start to feel a little bit of sympathy for Curley's wife?
When she confronts Lennie, Candy and Crooks in the stable. Admits to having a shameless dissatisfaction with her life. Dreams of being a movie star Her vulnerability makes he more human and more interesting than what she has been made out to be.
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However, what does Curley's wife's vulnerability in the stable reinforce?
It reinforces the novella's grim world overview. In her moment of weakness, Curley's wife seeks out even greater weakness in others, preying upon Lennie's handicap, Candy's age and the colour of Crooks' skin.
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Why does Curley's wife use the weakness of the other characters?
In order to keep herself from harm.
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How did readers know that Curley's wife was bad news?
Foreshadowing. She work a lot of red- connotes danger. Other characters attitudes. Warning of Lennie's fascination with certain things.
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Who is Crooks?
Crooks is a lively sharp-witted, black stable hand who takes his name from his crooked back.
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What is Crooks' character like?
He is extremely lonely, bitter about the discrimination he's faced. Crooks is a disempowered character who turns his vulnerability into a weapon to attack those who are even weaker.
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What does Crooks represent?
Crooks exhibits the corrosive effects that loneliness can have on a person. His character evokes sympathy as the origins of his cruel behaviour are made evident.
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What is it that Crooks wants?
Wants a sense of belonging- wants to fit in, companionship, kindness. Reason why he wants to join George and Lennie on the farm.
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Who is Curley?
The boss's son. Wears high heeled boots to distinguish himself from the field hands. Rumoured to be a champion prizefighter.
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What is Curley's character like?
He is confrontation, mean-spirited and aggressive young man who seeks to compensate for his small stature by picking fights with larger men.
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Why might Curley be even more confrontational now that he's married?
Curley is plagued with jealous suspicions and is extremely possessive of his flirtatious young wife.
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Who was slim?
Slim was a highly skilled mule driver and the acknowledged 'prince of the ranch'. Slim is the only character who seems to be at peace with himself.
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What is Slim's character like?
A quiet, insightful man. Slim alone understands the nature of the bond between George and Lennie, and comforts George at the books tragic ending.
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What do the other men think of Slim?
Look to Slim for advice. Respect him. Curley is jealous of him.
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Who is Carlson?
A ranch hand. He complained bitterly about Candy's dog. He convinced Candy to put the dog down and Carlson shot the dog. Later, George uses Carlson's gun to shoot Lennie.
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What does Carlson represent?
He represents the lynch mob and people who would have hunted Lennie down. He wouldn't have understood. He represents all the people who wouldn't have had compassion when it came to Lennie
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How does the story start?
Story opens with a description of a riverbed, salinas river. George and Lennie are walking along the path.
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What is the first thing readers see about George and Lennie?
George is telling warning Lennie not to drink too much water as if he were a child. It becomes clear that lennie has a disability and that George looks after him.
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What is the conversation as George and Lennie walk towards the ranch?
Talking about their new job and George was telling Lennie off for keeping a dead mouse in his pocket.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

A fact for context

Back

As a teenager, Steinbeck spent his summers working on neigbouring ranches.

Card 3

Front

A fact for context

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What was one of the ideas/theme for the book?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

A fact for context

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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