OCR A2 Chemistry: Phenols

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  • Created by: LucySPG
  • Created on: 15-09-13 14:00
What is the formula for a phenol?
C6 H5 OH
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What are phenols?
Compounds that have one or more -OH groups attached directly to a benzene ring
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What is the test for phenols?
Iron III chloride - turns purple
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Is a phenol a strong or weak acid?
Weak acid
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Why is the the O- ion on the phenol so stable?
The electric charge gets spread out by delocalisation onto the benzene ring
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What happens to the phenol when added to an aqueous solution?
Dissociates in water to form a phenoxide ion and a H+ ion
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Why do phenols dissolve a little bit in water?
The hydroxyl group is able to form hydrogen bonds with the water molecules
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What is formed when a phenol reacts with a base?
A salt and water
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What happens to the hydrogen ion on the phenol when it reacts with a base?
It is removed by the -OH ion
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Why don't phenols react with carbonates?
Because they are not strong enough bases to remove the hydrogen ion from the phenol
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What do the names of acyl chlorides end in?
-oyl chloride
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How do you form an ester using phenols?
React with an acyl chloride
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Why are penols reacted with acyl chlorides instead of carboxylic acids to make esters?
Phenols react very slowly with carboxylic acids
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What is formed when you react a phenol with an acyl chloride?
An ester and hydrogen chloride gas
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are phenols?

Back

Compounds that have one or more -OH groups attached directly to a benzene ring

Card 3

Front

What is the test for phenols?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Is a phenol a strong or weak acid?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why is the the O- ion on the phenol so stable?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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