Obedience: Milgram's research

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  • Created by: Gottowork
  • Created on: 15-05-16 12:19
What is obedience?
A form of social influence in which an individual follows a direct order, usually from a figure of authority
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How many participants did Milgram recruit, and how?
40 male participants through newspaper adverts, offered $4.50 to take part
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What sort of draw was there for the roles of 'learner' and 'teacher'?
Rigged - confederate Mr Wallace was always the learner
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What happened in Milgram's study?
Learner strapped in chair in other room - teacher told to give him increasingly severe shocks whenever the learner made mistake on learning task - started at 15V then rose through 30V levels to 450V. No response after 315V. All participants debriefed
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What did the experimenter give to the teacher when turned to for guidance?
A sequence of four standard 'prods', e.g. 'Please continue'
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Were the shocks real?
No, the first one a 45V was demonstrated to the teacher, but thereafter the shocks were not real
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What did Milgram find?
No participants stopped below 300V, 65% went all the way to 450V despite 14 psychology students predicting no more than 3% would go to 450V
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Why is Milgram's study said to have a low internal validity?
Orne and Holland - participants guessed shocks weren't real, Milgram himself reported 70% of his participants said they believed shocks were genuine
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What did Sheridan and King do?
Conducted similar study to Milgram's - real shocks given to puppy. 54% of male participants and 100% of females delivered what they thought was fatal shock. So effects of Milgram's study genuine
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Why does Milgram's research have good external validity?
Lab environment accurately reflected wider authority relationships in real life - e.g. Hofling et al. nurses, 21 out of 22 obeying. So findings can be generalised
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Why are there ethical issues in Milgram's study?
Allocation of roles actually fixed - participants were deceived, and many were extremely upset at harming another human. Betrayal of trust - could damage reputation
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How many participants did Milgram recruit, and how?

Back

40 male participants through newspaper adverts, offered $4.50 to take part

Card 3

Front

What sort of draw was there for the roles of 'learner' and 'teacher'?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happened in Milgram's study?

Back

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Card 5

Front

What did the experimenter give to the teacher when turned to for guidance?

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