Nutrition - Topic #5

HideShow resource information
What are the characteristics of first world countries (developed countries)?
Political stability, High life expectancy due to more food and medicines, greater access to trade and world markets, greater educated to secondary school, standard of living is high.
1 of 68
What are some examples of first world countries?
Australia, America, Englad, New Zealand
2 of 68
What are the characteristics of second world countries (communist/socialist countries)?
Communist or socialist governments
3 of 68
What are some examples of second world countries?
Former USSR and China
4 of 68
What are the characteristics of third world countries (developing countries)?
Political unrest, low life expectancy due to ill health and poverty, access to world market and trade blocked, poor standard of living, fewer educated at secondary level, high unemployment.
5 of 68
What some examples of third world countries?
Nepal, Zambia, Ethiopia
6 of 68
Define the term 'famine'
Long-term hunger for large numbers of people over an extended period of time.
7 of 68
Define the term 'mortality'
Death rate: the ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000per year
8 of 68
Define the term 'morbidity'
The relative incidence of a particular disease
9 of 68
What is undernutrition?
Insufficient kilojoule intake to meet the needs of the person over a long period of time.
10 of 68
What is a deficiency disease of under nutrition?
Marasmus
11 of 68
What is marasmus due to?
Severe undernutrition
12 of 68
What are the symptoms of marasmus?
Prominent ribs, sunken eyes, little or no fat
13 of 68
How do you help fix marasmus?
Increase protein: eat beans, nuts, lentils, cereals, eegs, meats, poultry, fish, milk, and cheese. AND... increase carbohydrate food: - corn, oats, maize, barley and any root vegetables like potatoes.
14 of 68
What is malnutrition?
Not having the correct intake of nutrients in the proportions required, caused by having a limited choice of food to consume. E.g. main diet is rice in Africa and china
15 of 68
What are some diseases of malnutrition?
Kwashiorkor, Beri-Beri, scurvy, Anaemia, Goitre, Rickets
16 of 68
What is Kwashiorkor due to?
A protein deficiency
17 of 68
What are the symptoms of kwashiorkor?
Apathy, retention of fluid in tissue and muscle wasting
18 of 68
How can you help fix kwashiorkor?
Increase protein: - eat beand, nuts, lentils, cereals, eggs, meats, poultry, fish, milk, cheese
19 of 68
What is Beri-Beri due to?
A thiamin deficiency (a B vitamin)
20 of 68
What are the symptoms of Beri-Beri
Retarded growth in children, weakness, digestive disorders, inflammation of nervous system
21 of 68
What is scurvy due to?
A Vitamin C deficiency
22 of 68
What are the symptoms of scurvy?
Poor wound healing, sore bleeding gums, frequent bruising
23 of 68
How do help fix scurvy?
Oranges and citrus fruit, potatoes, parsley, berries, pineapple, tomatoes, leafy vegetables
24 of 68
What is anaemia due to?
Iro, B12 and folate deficiency
25 of 68
What are symptoms of anaemia?
tiredness, loss of appetite, paleness, premature births if mother is a severe sufferer
26 of 68
How do you help fix anaemia?
Haem iron recommended such as meat, chicken, fish, egg yolks. However, these are limited in poverty-stricken areas so non-haem iron can also help, such as legumes, green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds
27 of 68
What is goitre due to?
Iodine deficiency
28 of 68
What are symptoms of goitre?
Enlargement of thyroid in neck, deaf, mute or retarded babies if mother is a sufferer, spontaneous abortions/still births
29 of 68
How do you help fix goitre?
Iodised salt, capsules or injections costing as little as 10c if food sources impossible, may be appropriate in developing countries.
30 of 68
What is infrastructure?
Infrastructure is the basic framework or underlying structure that is needed for economic development to take place, comprising of roads, ports, dams, reliable electricity and gas supplies.
31 of 68
Where is infrastructure limited?
In Somalia is limited in the use of their infrastructure due to war loads controlling the ports.
32 of 68
What is Emergency Aid?
Immediate, short term aid given to supply food, water, housing, medical supplies and medical practitioners and possibly a peace keeping component (soldiers) to help with distribution and maintain order.
33 of 68
What is Developmental Aid?
Works with emergency aid initially and strives to improve infrastructure, farming, food distribution. Considered a long-term solution.
34 of 68
What are non-government organisations (NGO's)
Organisations that work with developing countries to improve quality of life for the populations, including food, eduction, health, women's status in the community.
35 of 68
What are examples of NGO's?
Oxfam, World Vision International and Gates Foundation
36 of 68
What are cash crops?
Crops grown for cash, they use agricultural land that could be used to grow food for the surrounding population. E.g. coffee and opium
37 of 68
What is fair trade?
Where farmers are given a fair amount of money to produce crops. E.g. the middle man is reduced.
38 of 68
What is a reliable water supply?
A water supplt that is free from harmful levels of contamination and is reliable in quantity, therefore no flooding or droughts.
39 of 68
Why is a reliable water supply important?
it enables farmers to produce quality high yielding crops.
40 of 68
What is an example of a country with a non-reliable water supply?
Sudan, drought has affected larger parts of the country since 2001
41 of 68
What is corruption?
Lack of integrity or honesty; use of a position of trust for dishonest gain
42 of 68
What is an example of corruption?
Examples of corruption in Government would include Pakistan, Afghanistan and Zimbabwe
43 of 68
What is micro-financing?
Very small loans, typically less than $100, made to the rural poor in developing countries who normally do not qualify for traditional banking credit. This is often the only way they can establish a business and lift themseleves out of poverty
44 of 68
What is an example of when micro financing was useful?
Professor Yunus founded his Grameen bank in 1976 during a devastating famine in Bangladesh. And today it has 6.6 million borrowers.
45 of 68
What is a revolving loan fund?
An account that is repeatedly expended, replenished, and then expanded again.
46 of 68
What is an example of a revolving loan fund in use?
Community Aid Abroad has a fund that supplies farming equipment and seeds to farmers, when their crop is ready the farmers keep some seeds for the following year, sells some of the product, uses the rest to feed his family and from the profits of the
47 of 68
What is desertification?
When healthy land that is able to sustain food production is depleted of nutrients and water to a point where it can no longer sustain food production, basically turning into a desert.
48 of 68
What are reasons for desertification?
Over population/grazing, over irrigating.
49 of 68
What is hunger?
The uneasy or painful sensation and/or exhausted condition caused by want for food.
50 of 68
What are the main factors that lead to food shortages and famine?
Poor food distribution, Natural disasters, Political causes, Economic causes, Contaminated water
51 of 68
What factors contribute to food security?
Food is available, food is affordable, food is utilised.
52 of 68
What can food availability be impacted by?
Natural disasters, war, population size, social status, trade, environment
53 of 68
What can affect affordable food?
Shortage leads to increase in prices, only affordable for the richer - poor struggle to find nutritious products that are also safe.
54 of 68
How does food need to be utilised?
sufficient and varied food needs to be prepared safely so that people can grow normally, avoid disease and meet energy needs.
55 of 68
What are some reasons for food insecurity?
Poverty, health, water and the environment, Gender equity, disasters and conflicts, Population and urbanisation, trade
56 of 68
What can be done?
Improving food production, economic growth and trade liberalisation, distribution, recognising the role of women, food aid, education
57 of 68
What is the importance of education in reducing famine?
Education is vital for the health and safety of communities. Especially education on hygiene as it prevents the contamination of food by harmful pathogens. In addition, education about sex for both male and females will help control births
58 of 68
What are the advantages of provision programs?
Reduces death from acute food shortage
59 of 68
What are the disadvantages of provision programs?
Short term, doesnt solve the problem, discourages local production, reduces prices of local production, reduces desire to work
60 of 68
What are the advantages of agricultural developments?
Long term, more food, food gets to those who neet it, more control in the hands of the individuals
61 of 68
What are the disadvantages of agricultural developments
Need for eduction, cost
62 of 68
What are the advantages of educational programs
Long term, educating girls and women will lower fertility rates as wall as reduce infant mortality
63 of 68
What are the disadvantages of government subsidies?
Government aid money may not get to who needs it, local government may use it on other things instead of preventing famine i.e. military, arms
64 of 68
What are the advantages of health programs?
Short term and long term, less deaths due to disease illness, less contraction of diseases
65 of 68
What are the disadvantages of heatlh programs?
Cost of running and maintaining such programs
66 of 68
What are the advantages of good water?
Long term solution, less deaths due to water borne disease, less contraction of diseases
67 of 68
What are the disadvantages of water?
Cost and maintenance
68 of 68

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are some examples of first world countries?

Back

Australia, America, Englad, New Zealand

Card 3

Front

What are the characteristics of second world countries (communist/socialist countries)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are some examples of second world countries?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the characteristics of third world countries (developing countries)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Other resources:

See all Other resources »See all Nutriton - Topic #5 resources »