NMJ

  • Created by: Zammi10
  • Created on: 07-11-18 15:07
Which proteins are involve din the fusion of vesicles with the presynaptic membrane?
SNARE Proteins
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What are the two types of SNARE proteins?
v-SBARE (synaptobrevin) and t-SNAREs: Syntaxin and SNAP-25
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What is Synaptotagmin?
It is a vesicular protein that senses cytoplasmic Ca2+
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What happens to vesicles
1) Docking, which is when they come near pre-synaptic membrane. 2) Priming whihc incolves formation of SNARE complex (SNAP-25 and syntaxin). 3 fusing though this is Ca2+ deoendent.
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What are SNAREs?
SNAP receptors and SNAPs are involved in priming the synaptic vesicles for fusion--> these and NSF work to regulate assembly of the SNAREs
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What is another important SNARE protein?
synaptobrevin
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What do the snare proteins and snap proteins do?
form a macromolecule complex that spans the two membranes
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What is the inportance of this?
It promotes fusion of the two membranes
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What actually causes fusion?
NSF which is an ATPase which hydrolyses ATP so that energy may be released
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What differs from other forms of exocytosis?
Fusion usually follows immediately after priming. In this case, primed synaptic vesicles must be prevented from fusing until influx of Ca2_ triggers the process- synaptotagmin helps out
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What do V-gated Ca2_ channels of synaptic terminal bind to?
syntaxin thus the source of Ca2_ that trigger neurotransmitter release is held in close proximity to the calcium sensor molecule
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Card 2

Front

What are the two types of SNARE proteins?

Back

v-SBARE (synaptobrevin) and t-SNAREs: Syntaxin and SNAP-25

Card 3

Front

What is Synaptotagmin?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happens to vesicles

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are SNAREs?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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