Nazi domestic policies 1933-39

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Buffy
  • Created on: 03-05-14 14:32
Nazi education
was planned to make Germany strong. Hitler wanted children to grow fit and healthy; girls to be good wives and mothers; boys to be workers and soldiers.
1 of 23
Nazi schools
All children went school until they were 14. All schools had the same curriculum: PE took up a sixth of school time. Lesson taught Nazi views; for example, race studies taught Aryan superiority. Girls studied cooking and needlework.
2 of 23
Nazi youth movements
were also planned to make Germany strong. Pimpfen (Little Fellows, 6-14) and Jungvolk (Hitler Youth 14-18) were for boys. They trained them for the army. The League of German Maidens was for girls. It taught motherhood.
3 of 23
Edelweiss Pirates
was an anti-Nazi youth group. It had 2,000 members by 1939.
4 of 23
Nazi views about women
Nazis thought women should focus on the traditional kinder, kurche, kirche (children, kitchen, church). They frowned on women working, or wearing make-up or trousers. Some women felt devalued by Nazi polices.
5 of 23
Women and work
There were about 100,000 female teachers in Germany in 1933. The Nazis wanted women at home, and forced many women out of professions such as teaching and law. This created jobs for men and reduced unemployment.
6 of 23
Women and marriage
The law for encouragement of marriage (1933) lent couples who married 1000 marks (a month's wage) if the wife left work. For each child, they were let off a quarter of the loan. This boosted marriage, large families and women staying at home.
7 of 23
Women as mothers
The German Women's Enterprise supported the Nazi policy of large families. It gave classed and radio broadcasts on good motherhood. It gave the Mother's Cross to women with children: bronze for 4-5; silver for 6-7; gold for 8 or more.
8 of 23
The Lebensborn programme
Aimed to produce 'racially pure' Germans. It found 'racially pure' women for SS men to get pregnant. In just one Lebensborn home, from 1938-41, 540 single women gave birth to babies fathered by SS men.
9 of 23
Nazi economic policy
made industry serve the needs of the state. For example, iron and steel production trebled 1933-39. This made Germany more self-sufficient.
10 of 23
The four year plan (1936)
Hitler's plan to change the economy to make German ready for war in four years. As a result, arms spending went 3.5 billion to 26 billion marks and the army grew from 100,000 to 900,000 between 1933 and 1939
11 of 23
The German Labour Front (DAF)
It was the state-run Nazi replacement for trade unions. It set working hours and wages. Under the DAF, working hours went up by an average of 6 hours a week.
12 of 23
The Reich Labour Service (RAD)
Gave work to the unemployed. All young men had to do 6 months in the RAD from 1935. They did work vital to the, like farm work and public buildings and, by 1939, and built 7,000 miles of autobahn
13 of 23
Unemployment
Caused hardship and discontent, so Hitler kept it down with schemes like the RDF and army spending. Taking jobs from women and Jews also increased employment for men. So unemployment fell from 6 million to 1 million 1933-38.
14 of 23
Standard of living
Wages rose 20% and sales of consumer goods by 45% from 1933-38. But food prices rose too, and people worked 6 hours more a week. Car ownership in the 1930s; few Volkswagens were made: the factories soon moved to war production.
15 of 23
The SdA (Beauty of Labour)
Aimed to please workers and keep their support. It controlled working conditions like meals and safety standards.
16 of 23
The KdF (Strength through Joy)
ran sports centres and social activities, such as theatre trip and holidays, for workers. As a result, KdF became the world's largest tour operator in the 1930s.
17 of 23
Nazi views on race
'Pure' Western Europeans were 'Aryans' (Hitler's invented race). Then came races such as eastern Europeans Slavs. Next were 'sub-humans' (for example black people and the disabled). Gypsies and Jews were Lebensunwertes (unworthy of life).
18 of 23
First Racial Policies
The Nazis believed Jews weakened Germany. From 1933, they persecuted Jews. They organised boycotts of Jewish businesses. Then Jews could not work in government or the armed forces. They were banned from restaurants.
19 of 23
The Nuremberg Laws (1935)
Said Jews were no longer German citizens, so could no vote or have passports. From 1938, Jews had to register their possessions and carry identity cards. Jewish professionals, like doctors, could not have Aryan clients.
20 of 23
Kristallnacht (the Night of Broken Glass)
Over the night of 9 November 1938 the Nazis took revenge for the shooting of a Nazi official in Paris by a young Jew. Nazi official figures say 814 shops, 171 homes and 191 synagogues were destroyed and about 100 Jews killed.
21 of 23
Jews imprisoned
After Kristallnacht, 20,000 Jews were sent to concentration camps. In 1939, all Jews had to move into ghettos: walled-off areas of cities that kept them apart from other people. Housing and food supplies to the ghettos were bad.
22 of 23
Other targets
Nazi wanted to purify Germany. So they also persecuted gypsies and homosexuals; they were sent to concentration camps. Disabled people were sent to state 'care' homes, where many dies from deliberate neglect.
23 of 23

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

All children went school until they were 14. All schools had the same curriculum: PE took up a sixth of school time. Lesson taught Nazi views; for example, race studies taught Aryan superiority. Girls studied cooking and needlework.

Back

Nazi schools

Card 3

Front

were also planned to make Germany strong. Pimpfen (Little Fellows, 6-14) and Jungvolk (Hitler Youth 14-18) were for boys. They trained them for the army. The League of German Maidens was for girls. It taught motherhood.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

was an anti-Nazi youth group. It had 2,000 members by 1939.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Nazis thought women should focus on the traditional kinder, kurche, kirche (children, kitchen, church). They frowned on women working, or wearing make-up or trousers. Some women felt devalued by Nazi polices.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all WWII and Nazi Germany 1939-1945 resources »